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Updated: 9 hours 3 min ago

Through Cédric’s Eyes: Riley Montana in Nina Ricci

20 hours 44 min ago

Each week, renowned artist and fashion illustrator Cédric Rivrain unveils an exclusive drawing on Style.com. See fashion through his eyes, below.

Riley Montana in Nina Ricci

“A strict yet romantic lilac dress with just a few gathers defines the essence of femininity and the minimalist poetry of Peter Copping.” —Cédric Rivrain Illustration: Cédric Rivrain

Editor Obsessions: Jenni Kayne’s Metallic Gold Brogues

20 hours 52 min ago

Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

Is it wrong that I’m already thinking about fall shopping? I love summer weather, but I tend to get more excited about boots and jackets than sundresses and sandals. Next season, I’m updating my cold-weather uniform of skinny jeans and big sweaters with these gilded Jenni Kayne brogues. They have the ease of a slip-on sneaker, the androgyny of a men’s oxford, and a dressed-up vibe thanks to the high-shine gold. Plus, they remind me a bit of the plated Céline brogues I had my eye on last year—at a fraction of the cost. We may be in the dog days of summer, but I can’t wait for the chill to settle in so I can bust these out.

Jenni Kayne Metallic Leather Oxfords, $595, Buy it now. — Emily Farra

UPDATED: Nadège Vanhee Rumored to Be Hermès’ Top Pick

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 21:47

UPDATE: Multiple industry sources have now confirmed to Style.com that Nadège Vanhee will succeed Christophe Lemaire as the creative director of womenswear at Hermès. The house is believed to be sending out an official announcement tomorrow morning.

Let the rumors begin! According to WWD, word on the street is that behind-the-scenes star Nadège Vanhee, who cut her teeth at Delvaux and Maison Martin Margiela, worked under Phoebe Philo as the design director at Céline, and is now the design director at The Row, is Hermès’ top pick to succeed Christophe Lemaire as the head of womenswear. It would be nice to see someone like Vanhee, who has a wealth of experience and an eye for clean, sophisticated luxury, get a mega-gig like the one at Hermès—goodness knows she’s paid her dues. An announcement may be made as early as this week.

When I first heard this rumor, it reminded me of Jil Sander’s choice to hire Rodolfo Paglialunga—a designer who, save a stint as the creative director at Vionnet, earned his stripes working behind the scenes at Prada for 10 years. And then there’s the case of Julie de Libran’s appointment at Sonia Rykiel. Another under-the-radar gem, de Libran designed the pre-collections for Louis Vuitton, but was, of course, not as well known as the brand’s creative director and face, Marc Jacobs. Sometimes it makes sense to have a big name head up a big house. But it’s nice to see that the work of talented, though less famous, industry vets does not go unnoticed. — Katharine K. Zarrella

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/Indigitalimages.com

Esteban Cortazar’s Memories of Miami

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 21:19


Last week we reported that Esteban Cortazar is relaunching his label with a new concept we’ve dubbed “see-now, wear-now.” A few weeks after his upcoming collection is shown in Paris this September (he’s calling it Spring, but it’s really trans-seasonal), the first deliveries will arrive at Barneys New York and The Webster, as well as on Net-a-Porter. It’s a forward-thinking concept, to be sure. In this video, Cortazar turns back the clock and reflects on his 1990s youth in Miami, when the likes of Gianni Versace, Herb Ritts, Madonna, and Todd Oldham were discovering South Beach. “It made me who I am today,” he says. Watch the clip above, exclusively on Style.com. — Nicole Phelps

Dressing for Fame: Emily Current and Meritt Elliott Talk Designing, Styling, and Making It Work

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 19:53

If celebrity status is conferred in red-carpet appearances, then no actress today can compete without the help of just the right stylist. As Kerry Washington once told Glamour after she noticeably upped the sartorial ante, “There were a couple of actresses whom I felt were having the upper hand careerwise—because they knew how to work that red carpet.” A carefully crafted collaboration between stylist and client, the perfect look can create an indelible impact on agents, casting directors, and those of us watching from the sidelines. Straight from the epicenter of all things celebrity, we’ve asked some of the industry’s top stylists to share their experiences and impressions from their perch above Tinseltown. With our Dressing for Fame series, we bring you an exclusive, insider look at everything it takes to create those iconic moments captured by a million photo flashes.

Emily Current and Meritt Elliot

You probably know stylists Emily Current and Meritt Elliott from Current/Elliott, their namesake brand that launched a million boyfriend jeans. But before they were designers, they were stylists. And after they departed the label in 2012, Current and Elliott embarked on a journey chock-full of twists and turns that have helped them fine-tune their aesthetic. The women currently work on ad campaigns, editorials, and branded partnerships (their most recent collection for PBteen launched last week), and they even released a book dedicated to denim this past March. Counting Jessica Alba, Emma Roberts, and Mandy Moore as clients, Current and Elliott further their brand appeal with each new look they create. Here, the power pair speaks with Style.com about juggling design projects and celebrity clients, the aesthetic power of the stylist, and the challenges that come with dressing a new actress. — Alexis Brunswick

How did you two get into styling?
Meritt Elliott: We jumped from college into different parts of this industry. We worked for magazines and clothing companies, and we saw that the stylists had the most control in terms of being able to articulate and define a trend. It’s actually the physical part of going in and manipulating a garment or a shoe, and it just felt like the most tangible way to achieve what we wanted to see. We both love that hands-on feeling—we share that passion—and we became a team. So it was like, OK, this is the look you want us to do, and this is how we want it to be worn. We felt like stylists had the most power in that respect.

Why did you decide to try your hand at design, and what was it like going from styling to designing?
Emily Current: We were always in fittings and we were always kind of coming up empty when it came to relaxed bottoms and chilled-out denim pieces. A lot of what we were pulling at the time was really dressy. I think our transition into design was organic and it came out of styling—it came out of doing fittings and realizing that there was a hole in the market and that we had the ability to fill it.

As stylists, do you think it’s important to have your own recognizable aesthetic?
ME: It’s inevitable that you develop your own signature when you’re a stylist. I think it’s fifty-fifty—you have to read off of what the client needs or wants or what they’re aiming for, but I also think you have to bring a point of view, and that’s why you’re hired for a job. You’re not there purely to execute, but to bring an opinion. Over the past decade and a half, we’ve learned that it’s important to have an opinion, to speak up, to stand for something.

EC: I do think, though, that we really pride ourselves on sociologically diving into clients and figuring out who they are, who they want to be, and how to express their personalities through what they wear. So while our point of view and aesthetic is really important, it’s more about us being able to translate it through their needs.

Is it difficult catering to varying clients’ needs?
ME: I think, organizationally, it makes us understand a little bit more the full gamut of different needs, different designers, and different proportions. But that makes us better designers and better stylists, not being so one-sided. We love working with women with all different body types, needs, insecurities, and things they like to show off.

EC: We look at each client when we’re prepping for a fitting, and we sit there and put ourselves in their position, like this is a movie we’re promoting, it’s a sexier role, it’s a racier role, and then we look at what they have just worn and what they need to balance that out. We try and get into their headspace and what they need, and it’s always something different.

Do you ever feel a sense of pressure from critics, press, or fans?
ME: We’re not totally naive to the constant commentary going on and people having an opinion on best dressed and worst dressed, but I think we’ve evolved, and at this point in our lives, we care less. The good news is that the clients we work with don’t care that much either, and we love that about our client roster. We love that our brand philosophy is that there are no rules, and whether someone likes it or not doesn’t define whether it’s cool, new, or right for the moment.

Do you find your own partnerships and ventures detract from your styling or does it enhance what you’re doing?
ME: Schedule-wise, it’s hard to juggle. We have an amazing team that helps us. I think that they all hold hands, that we spend more time running all of these projects through our brand filter than anything else, and that exercise has helped us define who we are so much that now it’s easy and it’s much less of a discussion. It’s become such a joy whether we’re writing a book or designing a lamp or a pair of jeans. We now know exactly who our girl is and how [our product] needs to look and feel.

EC: I do think we split our brain into two sections. One is our own design projects, and everything goes through our brand filtering of what our point of view on design is. Then there’s a whole other side of our brain that we use for styling clients and consulting projects, where we go in and wear their hat and think, What does this brand need to build out a stronger business? or What does this client need to evolve within the fashion they’re wearing? So it’s two different hats that we wear.

What are some of the challenges that come along with being stylists?
EC: There are so many, but the one that comes to mind is when you take on a new client who is somewhat less well known, it’s a challenge to build their relationships with designers. When you’re working with someone new, it’s harder to pull the top designers and really vary who they’re wearing and how they’re wearing it.

ME: Along the same line are resources matching expectations. Sometimes a client will want something, whether it’s an advertising client or a celebrity client, and perhaps there isn’t the time or the budget or the availability. You’ve got to work with what you have. Sometimes we have a very narrow amount of resources, and we’re still expected to deliver, so we’re always challenging ourselves on how to be resourceful.

Photo: Getty Images

Kate Moss for Stella McCartney is the Stuff that Dreams are Made of

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 17:17

What does Kate Moss dream about? That was the question on Stella McCartney’s mind when she cast the iconic model in her Mert & Marcus-lensed Winter 2014 ad campaign, which debuted today. “Kate epitomizes the Stella McCartney woman and I wanted to capture her dreams and the moments we have shared over the years,” McCartney said of Moss, who has now appeared in her ad campaigns seven times. “I wanted to escape into something surreal this season, and fashion should make us dream, sometimes.” These particular dream-like images depict Moss inside zippered frames, which are surrounded by abstract landscapes of glaciers, forests, and the cosmos. The campaign will debut in the September issues of major international magazines. A short film titled Kate Dreams is set to follow.

—Emily Farra Photos: Mert & Marcus

Christopher Owens Talks Shooting Photos With Hedi Slimane, Going Country, and Modeling to Fund His Art

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 15:50

Two years ago, indie-rock figurehead Christopher Owens and his friend Hedi Slimane found themselves in the same position, tasked with starting new chapters in their careers: Owens had just announced the dissolution of his band Girls and Slimane was newly in charge at Saint Laurent, so they turned to each other for help. Slimane recruited Owens for his first campaign at the storied fashion house; that project doubled as Owens’ coming-out party as a solo artist. It was a mutually beneficial move that allowed Slimane to establish the rock-and-roll vibe he’s since maintained and gave Owens greater visibility as an artist and model. (Owens has since starred in an ad for Isabel Marant’s capsule collection for H&M, and has lent his looks to other photographers, including Logan White who snapped the shot above.)

A year later, Owens has settled into his solo career and reinvented himself again—this time with spurs and Stetson hats. His next solo album, fittingly titled A New Testament, has more of a country lean than anything he’s done before and, with it, comes Owens drawing from his days spent working on a ranch in Amarillo, Texas—cowboy attire, to boot. While preparing for the announcement of A New Testament—out September 30—the San Francisco-based artist took a moment to talk about his friendship with Slimane, his new country look, and his reaction to how musicians are turning more to fashion to fund their art.

— Marissa G. Muller

Had you been thinking of exploring country music in a more overt way for a while?
On the first Girls album, Album, there’s a song called “Darling” that I feel is a little country. On Broken Dreams Club, we tried to do things that were pretty country—we even had a pedal steel player. It was something I hoped to do in a more focused way. Then when I actually put my shoulder to the boulder on this one, I found all of these great elements coming out from people I had asked to work with me and I didn’t try to suppress those things. At the end of the day, I thought, We’re not coloring in the lines of the country aesthetic, but it would be a shame not to use it.

It seems like you’ve committed to that aesthetic all around. In promo photos, you wear country gear.
There is a bit of a story behind that. I lived in Amarillo for nine years before moving to San Francisco. I worked on a ranch, and the hats I’m wearing in the photos come from that period. One was a parting gift I got when I left the ranch. On various Girls tours, I’ve stopped in Amarillo and bought a new pair of boots—not thinking, One day I’ll use this for an album aesthetic. It’s just fun to get to do all of this stuff, image-wise. Modern country people are doing everything from dubstep to rapping; I think there’s room for me in there.

Has your wardrobe expanded a lot since you’ve taken on these modeling jobs with Hedi Slimane and Isabel Marant for H&M?
In the H&M shoot, I only wore one T-shirt and jeans, so I didn’t get any kind of wardrobe expansion, but Hedi was nice enough to send me a few things that I really liked.

Interestingly, when I signed up for H&M I was a little bit scared—it was very different from Saint Laurent. As much as it was whirlwind, when it came time to do the editorial photos for Saint Laurent, I had already shot on a personal level at my house, walking around Golden Gate Park, and Hedi’s house in L.A. as a friend—photos that weren’t to be used for anything, just photos for photos’ sake. We had become friends, so when he said, “Do you want to do this?” it was easier to say yes. Jeez, Yves Saint Laurent was a pillar of fashion, and I kind of fancy myself as a young David Bowie dipping my toe in the fashion pool.

The H&M thing was something where I thought, Maybe it’s not really me. I don’t know anyone there. At the same time, the music industry is changing. People don’t survive on record sales anymore. I had done a boutique-y album with my first solo album and said, “I’m only going to play small rooms with good sounds. I’m not going to play any festivals because they throw you up on stage five minutes before your set with no sound check.” Coachella was going to pay me for a short set whether it was good or not, and I said no to that. So the H&M thing seemed like the right thing to do at the right time. They were happy to pay me for my time. I lost money touring because I took a nine-piece band on a theater tour, and this was a way for me to recoup with my label and have money to do this album.

Sky Ferreira, another musician who has modeled for Hedi, has also talked about how modeling can be a good way to fund art.
I think it’s a very genuine issue right now for artists to find other ways to make money. People stream your music on Spotify and you get zilch back, and you’re expected to make videos and do a lot of things that cost money. I think it’s important to have some moral template that you keep in mind. I wouldn’t want to say, “Just hand over the rights of a song to a company to do whatever with.” I’m happy to take a photo. I like doing that. I think we will see more of this.

On the flip side, have you thought about why brands are more interested in using musicians instead of models?
You could be right about that, but, for me, I don’t really see that. I remember when Pete Doherty was Hedi Slimane’s muse. Back in the day, Mick Jagger and Bowie and Liza Minnelli were in fashion. I think it’s something that left during the post-punk alternative craze of everybody having to make a point and say “I’m not a sellout,” but I think that’s going away again. People are saying, “I like to work with other people on other things that’s not my work,” whether that’s being in a movie or being in fashion. I want to have budgets to make exciting records. I want to do things even bigger than I’ve been able to do.

Before the Saint Laurent ads, you weren’t in the mainstream public consciousness. How did you deal with being the face of a massive campaign?
[Hedi] followed it up very quickly with photos of Marilyn Manson, Courtney Love, and Beck, so the focus was taken off me very quickly. I feel like my photos that happened in the beginning were a bit anonymous. People were like, “Who is this Macaulay Culkin type with bad teeth in the new ads?” And it didn’t really matter who it was. The comments I saw were more on the aesthetic rather than directed toward me.

I really enjoyed that whole experience and I would do it again. Hedi was behind the camera. It wasn’t like I came in and shook his hand and he handed me off to some crew. It was very relaxed. The model was very professional and helped me to understand what to do in a photo shoot. I like to think of Hedi as a friend. He’s a very personable guy. No airs of greatness. He just likes to do his work, and he seems to work a lot, which I respect.

The timing was really interesting because both of you were kind of in the same place in different industries.
Yeah. It was while I was on the ranch that Hedi called me to ask about doing the campaign. I was on a little trip that was designed to get away from things—after I made the announcement that I was leaving my band—and I went to see my family and went back to Amarillo and stayed on Stanley Marsh’s ranch. The timing is bizarre, but isn’t that the way it goes? Sometimes things just line up right.

Photo: Logan White; Courtesy of Turnstile Records

EXCLUSIVE: Fashion East Reveals Spring ’15 Lineup

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 08:55

Believe it or not, the Spring ’15 shows are just around the corner, which means it’s time for us to reveal the trio of up-and-comers who have earned the support of Lulu Kennedy’s young designer initiative, Fashion East. This season, whimsical maximalist Edward Marler, a Central Saint Martins grad who already counts Katie Grand and M.I.A. as fans, will join returning talents Helen Lawrence and Louise Alsop. All three emerging designers will present their collections in the Fashion East group show during London fashion week. “Our lineup represents the ideas, energy, and boldness of the London scene right now,” Kennedy told Style.com. “Each designer feels totally relevant and on message.” Considering former Fashion Easters include Meadham Kirchhoff, Jonathan Saunders, and Simone Rocha, you can bet that, come 1 p.m. on September 16, our eyes will be glued to the Fashion East runway. — Katharine K. Zarrella

Photos: Courtesy of Fashion East

Prince George Turns 1, Makes Headlines

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 22:35

In one short year, the cherub-cheeked Prince George has stolen our hearts and the crown for best-dressed royal baby. The trendy toddler, who seems to prefer striped overalls and nautical prints, has already worn more stylish duds in his first year than most do in a lifetime. We’d imagine that the regal tot received at least a few new ensembles on this very special day, but due to his lack of an Instagram account, we can’t be certain. Here’s to a happy birthday, and many more years of sartorial stardom.

Via Huffington Post.

— Erinn Hermsen Photo: John Stillwell / AFP / Getty Images

Fifty Shades of Grey Director Sam Taylor-Johnson Takes Us Inside Coco Chanel’s Paris Pad

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 21:03

If you’ve always dreamed of touring Coco Chanel’s apartment on 31 rue Cambon, you’re in luck. Director Sam Taylor-Johnson, who just wrapped Fifty Shades of Grey, recently took up residence inside the designer’s home to shoot Second Floor, a set of 45 images that will debut at London’s Saatchi Gallery in September. According to The Telegraph, the exhibit will be everything we could hope for—and more. “Shooting at Coco Chanel’s apartment was an unexpectedly absorbing experience,” said Taylor-Johnson. “The essence of Chanel is firmly rooted there in all of her possessions, and I truly believe that her spirit and soul still inhabit the second floor.” We get pretty spiritual when we talk about Chanel, too.

Save for a few special guests, the apartment has long been a mystery to the public, so it’s going to be exciting to see Coco’s chandelier with rock-crystal camellias; leather-bound editions of Shakespeare, Voltaire, and Byron; and the white satin armchair in which she sat for a Horst photograph in 1937 (above). “The apartment is beautifully stylish,” said Taylor-Johnson. “It feels like she had meticulously chosen every object.” And in case you were wondering—no. None of those curated objects are whips.

Second Floor will be on view September 12 to 22 at the Saatchi Gallery, London, and will be accompanied by a book. — Emily Farra

Photo: Horst P. Horst

Editor Obsessions: Issey Miyake’s Bao Bao Platinum Tote

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 19:30

Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

I walk by the Issey Miyake Pleats Please store on Mercer Street every time I go to Physique57. Usually I don’t make it more than once a week (Sunday, 9 a.m.), but between Memorial Day and Labor Day, the class is a cherished late Friday afternoon activity. The extra pass-by has given me a lot of time to contemplate Miyake’s Bao Bao bags. Lately I’ve become especially keen on this platinum Prism tote. Big enough for my workout clothes plus my everyday essentials, it’s also remarkably lightweight. Nothing kills a Summer Friday buzz or an exercise high faster than a hot, heavy leather bag.

Issey Miyake Bao Bao Platinum Tote, $1,295. Buy it now. — Nicole Phelps

Photo: via isseymiyake.com

Zac Posen Loves Tibetan Singing Bowls, Is Opposed to Neutering Culture

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 18:00

Zac Posen never fails to give a great quote (or three), so we were thrilled to discover his “Ask Me Anything” forum on Reddit yesterday. Fans were invited to ask “almost” anything and everything for 30 minutes, with topics ranging from Posen’s design aesthetic to the trends he hates (adult hipsters) to his favorite dessert (it’s pâte â choux). Learn the designer’s secrets to success, happiness, and more, below. — Emily Farra

Banning trends is cultural castration, but adult hipsters have gotta go:

“Normally I don’t believe in banning any trends. Banning a trend is like neutering culture. But at the end of the day, we do have a choice not to be lemmings. Adult hipsters need to end. No flip-flops in an urban environment—they’re unhygienic. And generally, affluent or ‘rich kids’ dressing poor, dirty, and disheveled is reverse snobism and, quite frankly, really boring. What else? Shoes that a woman can’t walk in, atrocious—no, unforgivable. Too much public skin. If you’re going to wear that much skin, you might as well become a nudist. But make sure to wear sunscreen.”

Pre-Fall is to fashion as fresh fruit is to Whole Foods:
“Fashion [has] become so global that the seasons really don’t mean what they used to. The demand for more deliveries has accelerated. Essentially, think of [Pre-Fall as] that beautiful fresh-picked tomato sitting on the supermarket shelf. Who wants the tomato on sale?”

Fashion is a team sport:
“Teamwork. Teamwork. Anybody who says they create on their own and build a business off of it is telling big fibs…Karl Lagerfeld has referred to being a fashion designer in today’s world as being an Olympic athlete.”

Lilacs + Tibetan singing bowls + short films = happiness:
“The fruity-tooty answer [to the happiest thing I can think of] would be: surrounded in a garden where the walls were completely made of fresh lilacs, in a bathtub filled with very intense sea salt, harpsichord music or Tibetan singing bowls, maybe playing some saws. And the reality of the happiest thing would be to be able to entertain friends and family and people who are close to me for a weekend in which we did a creative project together. I love collaborating and making short films; maybe one day it will lead to a feature.”

Dresses have feelings, too:
“Each [dress] has its own iconic identity. I can’t pick favorites, because then they would get jealous of each other.

Photo: Angela Pham/BFAnyc.com 

Hood by Air Debuts Pre-Spring Collection and a Vision for the Future

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 16:42

Shayne Oliver built a brand, and now he’s using the momentum (and resources) from his recent CFDA nomination and 100,000-euro LVMH Special Prize to expand his vision. “We’ve had the exposure,” Oliver told Style.com from his new, unfinished office/atelier/retail space on the Lower East Side, “so now we’re teaching the customer how to engage with the brand.”

For upcoming seasons, Hood by Air as we know it will be divided into three parts—Hood by Air (wardrobe pieces) and HBA (printed pieces), both to be shown in New York, and an artisanal collection to be shown in Paris, which Oliver isn’t ready to reveal too much about just yet. “It will be Hood by Air for sure. It’s just really special,” he said. “And it will be a presentation as opposed to being a show, definitely meant to be intimate and one-on-one. It’s going to push the direction of this whole season. It’ll be the fire starter.”

In addition, there’s a very real possibility that brick-and-mortar retail is on the horizon. “VFILES was acting like a retail space for us, in a sense,” Oliver says. “Now we have the space to do it on our own. Our energy as opposed to having it be embedded in a VFILES situation. They’re growing their own culture, and we’ll be growing our own as well.” He’s already got plans for how he will strategically distribute certain products. “This space here will also be used as a platform to teach the customer. For instance, there will be certain styles, like basics that we think might be too basic for us to sell on our own, so it’s not like you’re going to a department store and you see a T-shirt and it’s cool—you come here and you engage with the moment, the feeling, and you get to be in that space in order to grab that simple T-shirt.”

The Pre-Spring 2015 collection, seen exclusively here, is a precursor to what will be shown in New York during fashion week. Digital prints, block letters, and stripes prevail, and the wardrobe pieces—shirts and jeans—are elaborately constructed experiments in deconstructed basics. The footwear, done in collaboration with Forfex, borrows details from Oliver’s favorite Nikes, Timberlands, and GBX boots. If previous collections were perceived as unisex, this offering is decidedly more in line with menswear.

All brands evolve over time, but Oliver says he feels a responsibility—to his fans and to the fashion industry that has supported him. “It was a passion project before, and now it’s a business,” says Oliver. “I don’t want to let anyone down.”

Click here to see the entire Hood by Air Pre-Spring 2015 Collection.

— Noah Johnson

The Unapproved YSL Film Trailer Has Hit YouTube, and It’s Spicy

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:50

Remember that other Yves Saint Laurent biopic that was announced last year? The one that didn’t get Pierre Bergé’s seal of approval? Well, the trailer for the film, which stars Gaspard Ulliel as the designer and Léa Seydoux as Loulou de la Falaise, hit YouTube today. And, featuring one minute and 50 seconds of sex, snakes, and cigarettes, it’s decidedly racy. In all seriousness, the latest movie explores the darker side of Saint Laurent’s life and relationships, which is likely why it didn’t get the thumbs-up from Bergé. But the approved flick, titled Yves Saint Laurent, didn’t really get the thumbs-up from critics and received mixed reviews. Somewhat ironically, the unapproved film, like the modern-day incarnation of the fashion house, is simply called Saint Laurent. Watch the trailer, above. — Katharine K. Zarrella

Mandy Coon Is Back in Business With New Accessories and a New Perspective

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:48

If you’ve been missing Mandy Coon since she left the ready-to-wear scene in 2012, you’re in luck. “I think I got to a point where I was just running a business, which was not really what I wanted to do,” said the designer, who hasn’t presented a collection for the past three seasons. But Coon has not thrown in the towel, rather, she’s now focusing all her efforts on an accessories range.

“I wanted to be able to focus and get really obsessed with something, and I love, love, love working with leather.” The former model decamped from Manhattan to the Catskills full-time more than a year ago. There, Coon cut her teeth in leatherworking—a craft with a pretty daunting learning curve. “It definitely took a lot of mistakes,” she laughed. “I watched videos, read a lot of books, and tried to learn from people who do the really traditional stuff. Then from there, I’d just find something I really wanted to make, and then that would be my task: I would just learn how to make that, and I would screw it up a lot until I got it.”

From that perseverance—and with plenty of Italian leather—Coon began developing her latest range of bags, belts, necklaces, and harnesses. She credits her new upstate digs with bringing the contrasts that have long distinguished her work [see bunny bags in badass black leather] to the fore. Also on the horizon? An expanded color palette. “I’m starting to try and incorporate more color, so maybe that,” the noir-loving designer said. While inky hues are still the order of the day for Coon, they make the appearances of rich cobalt and brilliant emerald all the more impactful.

Coon is keen to shake off the less-than-cosmopolitan connotations that in many circles still dog the idea of ethically produced, handmade pieces. “I think there’s still kind of a stigma,” she says. “I’m trying really hard to make things fashion-forward.” And indeed, from her textured bucket bags and strappy harnesses to her bondage-tinged totes and the aforementioned lapins in leather, Coon’s pieces are more Dover Street Market than farmers’ market—a marriage of the hard-edged and the handcrafted. “Just like [with] what they’re eating, I think people are starting to think about who’s making it and where it’s being made, if care is put into it or if it’ll fall apart,” Coon mused. “I think that’s important.”

Mandy Coon accessories, priced between $125 and $1,125, are available at mandycoon.com. —Kristin Anderson

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

Shop the Look: Rainbow Bright

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:08

While scrolling through our latest crop of Tommy Ton street-style photos, we found a range of new trends to try, from minimalist suits to basketball shorts to our current favorite look: hyper-vivid color combinations. We saw clashing patterns, three shades of neon, and interesting new fabrics—and that was all on one outfit. It’s inspiring us to think outside the black-and-white box and incorporate a few more pops of color into our wardrobes. Even one pair of standout shoes gives your go-to jeans a playful lift. Or do as the editors do and wear the entire Roy G. Biv spectrum. Either way, our approach to summer dressing just got a whole lot livelier. Shop our favorite rainbow-bright pieces by Carven, Michael Kors, and more, below. —Emily Farra

1. Michael Kors stretch-cotton poplin skirt, $695, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Charlotte Olympia Neon Sign Girls clutch, $1,495, available at nordstrom.com

3. Illesteva Leonard tortoise sunglasses with blue-mirrored lenses, $177, available at editorialist.com

4. Carven green suede bow strap ballerinas, $212, available at avenue32.com

5. J.Crew gemstone floral printed silk top, $120, available at net-a-porter.com

Lynn Yaeger and Yoox.com’s Rare Discovery Is a Vintage Addict’s Kryptonite

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 21:58

If, like me, you are a Japanese design devotee, get ready to empty your savings account. Lynn Yaeger, acclaimed fashion journalist, New York eccentric, and aggressive wearer of Comme des Garçons, was recently appointed as the curator of vintage clothing at Yoox.com. The release of her first shoppable selection happened to coincide with Yoox’s 10th anniversary of launching in Japan. And what better way to celebrate than with a range of hard-to-find items designed by Japanese fashion demigods like Issey Miyake, Comme des Garçons’ Rei Kawakubo, Kansai Yamamoto, Kenzo Takada, Yohji Yamamoto, and Junya Watanabe? “These clothes are revolutionary in their conception and execution,” Yaeger told The Independent of the collection, which she’s titled “Mezurashi Hakken,” or “Rare Discovery” in English. “They are beyond season, they never date. Clothes that look a little strange on the hanger can be wonderful on the body. For this collection, each piece had to be a unique, interesting example of each designer’s contribution, and they have to be wearable,” added Yaeger, who reportedly scoured the world to hunt down these pivotal pieces. Judging by the number of garments that are heartbreakingly marked SOLD, it would seem that Yaeger’s debut Yoox effort is going pretty well. With that in mind, I advise you to shop quickly—these vintage treasures won’t last. —Katharine K. Zarrella

Photo: Via Yoox.com

Tim Coppens, Liya Kebede, and More Join the CFDA

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 21:14

Every spring, the Council of Fashion Designers of America admits a new crop of designer members. They apply to the program like any other job: résumé, portfolio, and letters of recommendation. This year, 30 new members have been chosen, including Jonathan Simkhai, Lemlem’s Liya Kebede, Tim Coppens, Veronica Beard’s Veronica Swanson Beard and Veronica Miele Beard, and Edun’s Danielle Sherman. The membership total is now 478.

“These designers are not just uniquely talented, but they also represent, through their businesses, an important contribution to American economy and job creation,” said Steven Kolb, CEO of the CFDA, in a statement. In addition to hosting the CFDA Fashion Awards in New York each year, the CFDA offers programs that support professional development and scholarships in fashion design, like the CFDA Fashion Incubator and the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, among several others.

In other CFDA news, the board voted for CFDA president Diane von Furstenberg to extend her stay through 2016. Von Furstenberg has been president since 2006. “The board’s unanimous decision to ask Diane to stay on as president is a testament to the great growth the CFDA has had under her leadership,” Kolb said. “An additional two years will make it a decade of Diane with the time spent on strengthening the board and organizational development.” —Emily Farra

The full list of new members is below:

Linda Balti, AMOUR VERT
Raan Parton, APOLIS
Shea Parton, APOLIS
Arielle Shapiro, ARI DEIN
Ashley Pittman, ASHLEY PITTMAN
Ben Burkman, BURKMAN BROS
Doug Burkman, BURKMAN BROS
Carlos Campos, CARLOS CAMPOS
Clare Vivier, CLARE VIVIER
Danielle Sherman, EDUN
Ernest Sabine, ERNEST ALEXANDER
Eva Zuckerman, EVA FEHREN
Jonathan Simkhai, JONATHAN SIMKHAI
Jussara Lee, JUSSARA LEE
Barbara McReynolds, L.A. EYEWORKS
Gai Gherardi, L.A. EYEWORKS
Liya Kebede, LEMLEM
Kristy Caylor, MAIYET
Marc Alary, MARC ALARY
Paige Novick, PAIGE NOVICK
Ruthie Davis, RUTHIE DAVIS
Virginie Promeyrat, SELIMA DESIGN
Sharon Khazzam, SHARON KHAZZAM
Johnny Talbot, TALBOT RUNHOF
Tim Coppens, TIM COPPENS
Ulla Johnson, ULLA JOHNSON
Veronica Miele Beard, VERONICA BEARD
Veronica Swanson Beard, VERONICA BEARD
Cynthia Sakai, VITA FEDE
Whitney Pozgay, WHIT

Photo: Courtesy of CFDA

Editor Obsessions: Heather Huey’s Rhinestone-Embellished Bunny Ears

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 20:16

Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

My obsession this week fuses my two true loves: hats and my black rabbit, Mssr. François Froufrou. I am about to order Heather Huey’s spectacular rhinestone-embellished bunny ears. Naturally, I’ll wear them as an ode to my furry companion, and I envision pairing them with a voluminous Comme des Garçons look. I’m also planning on donning Huey’s headpiece on Halloween. You see, with this topper, I can throw on my vintage black jumpsuit and dress as François. François will then wear his custom Piers Atkinson top hat and go as me—pending his approval, of course. As Amy Sedaris told me, bunny’s always the boss.

Heather Huey bunny ears, $750, Buy it now —Katharine K. Zarrella

Photo: Via heatherhuey.com

From Lanvin to Saint Laurent, Fashion Can’t Get Enough of Edie Campbell

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 20:00

Without a doubt, Edie Campbell is fashion’s muse-of-the-moment. Coming off of several seasons of stellar editorial and runway work, the It Brit model’s star continues to rise this summer with a deluge of recently released campaigns. Last week alone, Campbell debuted in ads for Alexander McQueen and Lanvin. The latter’s Tim Walker-lensed shoot was a true family affair: Campbell posed alongside her mom, Sophie Hicks; dad, Roddy; mullet-rocking brother Arthur; younger sister Olympia; and her oft-Instagrammed horse, Dolly.

In addition to being a mainstay on the Saint Laurent catwalk, Campbell is also the new face of YSL Beauty’s Black Opium fragrance and has landed yet another Marc Jacobs Beauty campaign. Other recent work includes Bottega Veneta’s Fall ’14 series lensed by David Sims, as well as ads for Hugo Boss and Sandro. Sweetening the deal is Campbell’s latest Vogue Italia group cover (in which she premieres a freshly lightened blond shag) photographed by Steven Meisel. With her versatile, aristocratic look and wry sense of humor, it’s no wonder the industry can’t seem to get enough Edie right now. We approve. —Brittany Adams

Photo: Courtesy Photos