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Updated: 5 hours 51 min ago

First Karl, Now Cannes: Creatives Can’t Get Enough of the Old West

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 21:19

It’s time to head West—cinematically speaking, at least. Next month’s Cannes Film Festival lineup includes a surprising number of Westerns, including The Homesman, starring Meryl Streep, Tommy Lee Jones, and Hilary Swank (and co-written and directed by Jones), and Deux Jours, Une Nuit, a “Belgian Western” starring Marion Cotillard. We won’t attempt to explain how or why the world’s top filmmakers became collectively inspired by Western stories, but we will say this: From a stylistic standpoint, it makes perfect sense. Consider the recent obsession with all things Americana, a subject our editor in chief detailed in our latest issue of Style.com/Print. And of course, there was the Chanel Metiers d’Arts show in Dallas last December, in which models stomped down a hay-strewn runway in leather fringe, big gallon hats, and Native American motifs. It was the show that sparked a thousand Instagrams and had even the most discerning editors rethinking cowboy boots. As usual, Chanel was ahead of something huge. We’re curious to see if these new films at Cannes encourage a similar surge of interest in old-school American culture. —Emily Farra

Photo: Getty Images 

Runway to Red Carpet: Dress Hems Are on the Rise

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 19:49

Despite the fact that it snowed in New York this week, the red carpet was full of summer vibes. Winter coats returned on the East Coast, and in Hollywood, short hemlines and light colors flourished for a bevy of parties, premieres, and award shows.

On Tuesday, Chloë Grace Moretz attended the opening night celebration of The Library in New York in an ecru lace frock with a black yolk from the Carven Pre-Fall ’14 lineup. The same night, another one of our favorite A-list teens, Kiernan Shipka, stepped out in a white, yellow, and gray patterned Preen dress for Jimmy Choo’s Choo.08 launch party in L.A.

With the premiere tour for The Amazing Spider-Man 2 officially underway, Emma Stone spent a lot of time on the red carpet this week. She stuck to a similar color palette for her Berlin appearances on Tuesday, choosing a light blue Erdem Fall ’14 frock dotted with red beading for the photo call and a Chanel Pre-Fall ’14 dress with a pale lavender skirt and red-striped bodice for the premiere that evening.

In case you were missing all that awards season glamour, Sunday’s MTV Movie Awards brought it back with a summery twist. Ellie Goulding walked the red carpet in a white Emporio Armani dress with cutouts on the sides, while Lupita Nyong’o opted for a gray Chanel Fall ’14 dress speckled with colorful geometrics. Rihanna strayed from the red-carpet norm, turning up in a beige corseted bodysuit and a pink silk robe from Ulyana Sergeenko’s Spring ’14 Haute Couture that took the leg-baring trend to a new level. Your move, Angelina.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights. —Erinn Hermsen

Photo: Christopher Polk / Getty Images

Required Reading: Parsons The New School for Design Releases Its First Book

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 18:59

Nostalgic Parsons designers rubbed elbows among alumni old and new at Milk Studios last night in celebration of the design school’s first book. One would think that all those featured in The School of Fashion: 30 Parsons Designers were star pupils, but Anna Sui wasn’t one of them. Inside the crowded room, the designer confessed to her less-than-scholarly ways. “Being 18 and living in New York City with no parental guidance, I wasn’t a good student,” confessed Sui. But it was a fun time, she admitted.

Working her way around the room, Behnaz Sarafpour correctly named all of the designers whose sketches hung along the walls—including her own, drawn on a cocktail napkin. Sarafpour later reunited with fellow alum Reed Krakoff who, like her, once interned with Narciso Rodriguez. The two stood in front of a wall of black-and-white portraits opposite Proust questionnaires that asked designers Alexander Wang, Derek Lam, and Jason Wu the following: “What fictional character do you most identify with?” and “Who are your heroes in real life?” For Chris Benz, who was in attendance, the answers included Tom Sawyer and Martha Stewart, respectively.

“When I realized there hadn’t been a book written, I figured it’d be crazy not to,” said Simon Collins, the school’s dean of fashion, who hosted the event along with Milk’s Mazdack Rassi. The new tome includes thirty designer-dedicated chapters with a host of vibrant illustrations, photographs, and introspective quotes taken from exclusive interviews conducted over the past year. Part of the proceeds from sales will benefit scholarships for Parsons students.

While upping the school’s fashion cred ranks high on Collins’ to-do list, the dean was quick to boast that crafting the book was good for all involved. “I mean, the designers loved it,” offered Collins. “They can show their mums.”

The School of Fashion: 30 Parsons Designers is published by Assouline. Available at select bookstores or online at assouline.com. —Sophia Gonzalez

Photo: Lola Haze/BFAnyc.com 

Regarding Susan Sontag: A New Doc on Her Force of Personality and Brainpower

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 18:30

Regarding Susan Sontag is a new documentary playing at the Tribeca Film Festival this weekend and will air on HBO this fall. The film is an intimate look at the influential American writer, filmmaker, political activist, and cultural critic. Sontag is widely considered to be one of the most important, outspoken, and provocative thinkers of the 20th century. Her writings include novels, short stories, and film scripts, but she was best known for her critical essays that examined all kinds of social and artistic issues. Sadly, Sontag died of leukemia in 2004 at 71 years old, but her work still resonates today. Style.com spoke to the film’s director, Nancy Kates, about Sontag’s creative process and wide-ranging influence, and what inspired her to make the film.

What made you decide to make this film about Susan? I imagine that you have followed her work for a long time.

I was saddened by Sontag’s death in late 2004, which was also the year my father passed away. Sontag was a heroic figure to me in my youth. Like many smart young women in the 1980s, when I was 20 or so, I wanted to grow up to be like her—confidant, fearless, supersmart, and not willing to play second fiddle to men. I was always interested in what she had to say—I had the idea to make the film [when I was] at my office, and when I went home, I counted the Sontag books on my shelf. I had seven of the sixteen books she published in her lifetime, which seemed like a good sign, particularly because I read her purely out of interest and not because her work was assigned to me in a classroom setting. In some ways, this film is a look back from middle age at the person I was thirty years ago.

Susan’s writing was incredibly powerful, articulate, and candid. She also had a wide range of interests. What do you think her greatest passion was?

Critic Wayne Koestenbaum, who is interviewed in the film and served as one of our advisers, refers to Sontag as a “cosmophage”—someone who eats the world or consumes the world. It is probably not fair to single out one of her passions—she had passions for words; ideas; books; photographs and the realm of photography; her lovers, most of whom were women; and for more ordinary pleasures, such as Chinese food. Her work was a deep expression of most of those passions, though she hid her sexuality, which, ironically, probably limited her ability to write fiction. Interviewed about her historical novel The Volcano Lover, in 1992, Sontag told a journalist, “I’m interested in various kinds of passionate engagement. All my work says be serious, be passionate, wake up.”

Which one of your interview subjects offered the most insight into Susan’s creative process?

I think it is unsporting to play favorites among the interviewees, but Don Levine, who spent a long time as a sort of unpaid editor and writing collaborator, was extremely helpful in describing the long stretches of work they did together on Death Kit and Antonin Artaud: Selected Writings, which they edited together, though Sontag is the sole editor on the cover of the book. So many of our interviewees are also writers; they are speaking about Sontag through their own experiences writing on other subjects.

How do you think Susan was able to be both an influential critic and a sort of celebrity?

Sontag was unique in American letters, in that she had a mind that would not quit, and was also very beautiful, which was part of her appeal and partly why she became so famous, though I think she also sought fame in a way that had been unfashionable among the previous generation, i.e., the writers of the 1950s and early sixties. Like many people who become famous, she craved that sort of public attention, and needed it, in certain ways. I don’t know that she would have had the celebrity without the looks, even though it pains me to say so. She was also willing to be a bit outrageous in her public statements, such as the one she made during the Vietnam War: “The white race is the cancer of human history.” Through sheer force of personality—and considerable brainpower—Sontag made sure that she was not going to be dismissed or condescended to because of her gender, managing to avoid the sort of treatment that most women in the public eye experienced in the 1960s and seventies, and sometimes even today. —Chris Black

#CookingWithZac: Zac Posen’s Passover Chocolate Mousse With Hazelnut Oil

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 17:55

Anyone who follows Zac Posen on Instagram knows he’s not only handy with a needle and thread. After a long day at his Tribeca atelier or the television studio—Project Runway won its first Emmy with Posen on the program—the designer goes home and whips up fabulous home-cooked meals, many of which he posts to his account for the delectation of his more than 423,000 followers. It will be no surprise when he lands his own cooking show. And we know what he should name it: CookingWithZac, of course, after the hashtag he uses for his food pics. In honor of Passover, Posen shares one of his favorite recipes. And no, it’s not brisket.

 

Passover Chocolate Mousse With Hazelnut Oil
Preparation time: 10 minutes; chill: 4 hours
Servings: 8
Ingredients
* 7 ounces dark chocolate 70 percent cacao
* 1/2 cup hazelnut oil
* 1 vanilla bean, scraped
* 4 eggs, separated
* 2/3 cup powdered sugar (kosher)
* 1/3 cup brewed coffee
* pinch of kosher salt

Directions
Start melting the chocolate in a saucepan over low heat. Let it cool at room temperature before adding the hazelnut oil, the scraped vanilla bean, and coffee. Set aside.

In a mixer bowl, beat the egg yolks and powdered sugar until the mixture is pale yellow, thick, and forms a ribbon. Add this to the chocolate mixture.

Whisk the egg whites until they are stiff but not dry-looking, then fold the whites into the chocolate.

Pour into dessert cups and refrigerate for at least four hours.

Sprinkle on some kosher salt right before serving.

Photo: Instagram/@zac_posen

Marina’s Must-Have: A.B. Biagi’s Brigadeiro Gelato

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 16:55

For the non-Brazilians reading this, brigadeiro is a Brazilian candy. It has a similar taste to dulce de leche from Argentina, but it’s made with chocolate, so it’s supersweet and superrich. Antonio Barros Biagi, a personal friend, opened a gelateria in Nolita last summer and has been very experimental with this flavor ever since. Now for Easter, Antonio is introducing Brigadeiro. It arrived at the office yesterday and it was a hit. In a matter of minutes, the three pints were gone! This Sunday, my family and I are having Easter lunch at a friend’s house, and instead of the traditional chocolate Easter egg, I’ll be bringing Brigadeiro gelato for dessert. You should do the same.

A.B. Biagi gelato, $4.75 per scoop, $13.90 per pint. Available at A.B. Biagi, 235 Elizabeth Street, New York; (212) 219-8094. —Marina Larroudé

Photo: George Chinse 

Bianca Brandolini and Alexia Niedzielski Collaborate with Osklen

Fri, 04/18/2014 - 14:29

Everything’s coming up Rio this season. At last week’s much-buzzed-about Fashion Rio shows, we couldn’t help but get a little jealous after seeing all the island-ready prints and colors. (How many vacation days do we have left?) We were particularly drawn to Oskar Metsavaht’s latest swimwear offering at Osklen. For the first time, the designer—who also presents ready-to-wear in New York—focused solely on his swim range, which he designed in collaboration with stylish jet-setters Bianca Brandolini and Alexia Niedzielski. A first look at the collection debuts exclusively here. “While our customers know and love our swimwear, I wanted to increase visibility through our runway show,” Metsavaht told Style.com. “[Bianca and Alexia] are half-Brazilian, half-French, so [they] embody our mood, carioca mixing elegance and cosmopolitism.”

Niedzielski cited the French Riviera of the fifties and sixties and photos taken there by Slim Aarons as the main sources of inspiration. Luckily, there were no string bikinis in sight. “We wanted to explore new bikini shapes,” she said. “This is very new for Brazil, as they are used to tiny, mini bikinis! We wanted to revisit retro cuts in a modern, Brazilian way.” Bustier-style tops, high-waisted bottoms, and molded cups had a pinup vibe, but metallic finishes, saturated colors, and tropical prints packed a modern punch. “We wanted to stay faithful to the Osklen DNA by using all of these beautiful patterns of Rio and Brazil’s luxe vegetation,” she added.

Niedzielski and Brandolini also knew exactly what women look for in a swimsuit. “We really tried to design for lots of different women. Our mothers with elegant one-piece suits, our sisters with more cheeky cuts and jumpsuits…We named each piece according to someone we know,” they explained.

Not vacation-bound? Not a problem. Many of the pieces could easily transition from beach to street, blurring the line between swimwear and ready-to-wear. All the more reason to stock up. “I really think we created a collection that is original and new, a balance between the chic European style with the sexy Brazilian beach culture,” Metsavaht said. —Emily Farra

On the Rise: Kid Cudi and the Male Crop Top

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 21:41

One of the most talked about fashion moments of Coachella’s first weekend didn’t belong to Pharrell, Beyoncé, or Jay Z. Kid Cudi had that honor when the rapper stepped on stage in an athletic red crop top with cutoff jean shorts, exposed BAPE briefs, and a gold bolo tie necklace, no less, providing the Internet with days of fodder. Some got angry, others were just confused, and a few went as far as to predict that Cudi’s provocative top is destined to spark a trend.

Those in the latter group aren’t far off. Crop tops for men have been gaining steam on the runway over the past few years. Just as the midriff-baring top went high fashion for women—receiving an update from designers like Proenza Schouler, Prada, and Topshop—younger eccentrics and established brands alike are reimagining it for men. Four years ago in Milan, flamboyant label Frankie Morello showed two versions of the abs-flashing top, one graphic tee reminiscent of Wham!’s namesake crop top and a knitted take that left less to the imagination. That same year, Calvin Klein sent out cutoff outerwear and cropped T-shirts stamped with the brand’s name. Copenhagen maximalist Astrid Andersen followed suit the next year with her own cheeky cropped muscle tee. Since Andersen started experimenting with it more over the past two seasons, other designers like Hood by Air, J.W. Anderson, and Sibling have been chiming in with their own renditions, taking the crop top from the Muscle Beach days to the catwalk.

Hood By Air Fall 2014 Photo: Yannis Vlamos/IndigitalImages.com

Astrid Andersen Spring 2014 Photo: Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images

The male crop top has an even longer history in pop culture, being championed by everyone from Prince to Will Smith as the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. But it’s been on hiatus for nearly a decade, until Kid Cudi brought it back this past weekend. Whether the rapper is channeling a throwback look or a runway trend, it’s an indication that mainstream rap is continuing to evolve to become sartorially more inclusive—Kanye West weaving high-fashion references into his verses; A$AP Rocky embracing forward-looking, androgynous looks; and some even embracing womenswear, like Atlanta upstart Young Thug in his leopard peplum dress. Coachella, it seems, has become the premier location for rappers to take big style risks—remember when Ye wore a Céline shirt on the very same stage three years ago? Cudi, who was once signed to West’s label, GOOD Music, is now breaking down hip-hop’s rigidly masculine boundaries in his own way.

—Marissa G. Muller Photo: Tim Mosenfelder/WireImage

6397, Won’t You Be My Boyfriend Jean?

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 21:21

“Boyfriend jean” imposters, beware. Where once there were only ill-fitting baggy pants masquerading under that nebulous title, today there’s a variety of more convincing options. At the forefront is industry vet Stella Ishii’s 6397, a brand born of Ishii’s own quest for the correct ratio of slouch to slimness.

Ishii, who started her career as a translator to Rei Kawakubo in the late seventies, quickly made a name for herself, and by the mid-nineties was helming Staff USA, where she brought the likes of Maison Martin Margiela and Vivienne Westwood stateside. Departing just after Renzo Rosso acquired Staff International, Ishii launched The News in 2001. The airy Soho loft-cum-sales and press agency became a quick favorite among the industry and aided in the successes of bold-faced brands like The Row, Alexander Wang, and 3.1 Phillip Lim. In the fall of 2012, spurred by forays into tailoring men’s denim to fit her own frame, Ishii launched 6397 and found acclaim and a burgeoning fan base that includes such categorically cool women as Lauren Hutton, Patti Smith, and Jamie Bochert.

Fast-forward to present day, and what began as a quest for the perfectly slouchy jean has grown rapidly: Today, denim makes up about only 35 percent of 6397′s offerings. The label’s keen eye for detail (its cult favorite Twisted Seam denim was an homage to the way a man’s pant leg naturally rotates inward over the course of the day) translates into collections of impeccably cool, androgynous basics. Mechanics suits, cashmere loungewear, elegant silk camisoles, a buttery camel coat—6397 boasts all the building blocks of the ultimate easy wardrobe. A fruitful long-term partnership with graphic designers Studio 191 spawned a series of emblazoned tees last year, bearing enigmatic slogans such as “High as the hills”; another boasts the reproduced scrawl of a (damned good) Nirvana set list. Per Ishii, “We have known and worked with [Studio 191] for almost fifteen years, so there’s a real sharing of aesthetics and humor that makes it fun.” And while the 6397 woman at first glance would seem to share some sartorial DNA with both 21st-century Parisian gamines and downtown Manhattan girls, Ishii is hesitant to put geographical boundaries on her brand’s ethos. “I think it’s more of a mind-set that’s universal.” It pays to be fluent in the language of cool.

6397 is available at Barneys New York, Totokaelo, and Le Bon Marché.

—Kristin Anderson

Playlist: Ellie Goulding’s Best Songs

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 18:09

British-born singer Ellie Goulding has some big news.

Sure, her debut album, Lights, went triple platinum when it hit the U.S. in 2010. And yes, the singer-songwriter won the hearts of her bourgeoning international audience when she performed a chilling cover of Elton John’s “Your Song” at the wedding reception of Prince William and Kate Middleton in 2011—a rendition that was heard stateside when Goulding appeared on NBC’s SNL. In 2013, she took home an MTV Movie Award for Best Song of the Summer, for the Calvin Harris-produced track “I Need Your Love,” then recorded an exclusive track, “Mirror,” for The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

But today Ellie Goulding joins Style.com’s Style Map, a network of contributors from around the blogosphere, and we are honored to have her. To celebrate her new gig, here are our ten favorite Ellie songs. —Rachel Walgrove

Zosia Mamet Celebrates Spring With Honor

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 17:45

“I was thinking of fireflies and a summer wedding…or a funeral,” recalled Honor’s Giovanna Randall. “Something under the stars, a mysterious event, a nighttime party—the idea that sad times and really happy times bring people together.” The designer is talking about the origins of her Spring ’14 collection—a moodily feminine assortment of barely decaying lace and vintage-fabric-adapted, botanical-printed pieces—and the inspiration for the range’s new film, which debuts here. Written and directed by Honor cofounder Rachel Fleit, the short follows a grief-stricken girl (none other than Girls star Zosia Mamet) as she bakes a cake for a lost friend (Zoe Kazan) and conjures up the friend from the grave for a midnight birthday celebration.

It’s an eerie, bewitching trip through loss and celebration, a sort of mystical evening set in a weathered, Secret Garden-style mansion. “Giovanna and I have both experienced the loss of important women in our lives since we started Honor,” explained Fleit. “I had this on my mind when I was writing the script—what it would be like if we could bring them back to the physical world for an evening. I imagined we’d dance around in fabulous dresses, eat lots of cake, and just be with each other…all the best things.”

For Mamet, the short was equally emotionally charged. “The role was one of a girl experiencing true loneliness,” she said. As for the clothes, which, unlike in most fashion films, take a back seat to the plot, “I’m not a very girly girl, but I do enjoy embracing my femininity,” Mamet offered. “I think Giovanna’s clothes do that to a T. They always make me feel beautiful.” —Ashley Simpson

Paige Novick and Fivestory Launch a Colorful Collaboration

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 17:23

Shoppers can always count on Upper East Side boutique Fivestory for Claire Distenfeld’s reliably unexpected buys and singular tastes. Paige Novick is a friend and fan (the designer launched her fine jewelry collection, Phyne, at Fivestory last fall), which makes her the perfect partner for Fivestory’s first fine jewelry collaboration, Arc en Ciel. “Claire and I were enamored with the idea of incorporating traditional gemstones such as emerald, ruby, and sapphire with unconventional shapes,” Novick said of the five styles in the collection that earned its name from the rainbow effect that the multicolored ear cuffs took when layered on Distenfeld’s lobes. “Knowing how much Claire embraced color inspired me to push past my default parameters, which was ultimately very liberating,” she said. The pieces are designed around a refreshingly spring-worthy palette, while Novick’s own Phyne line focuses on finishes and shapes rather than color.

Distenfeld, too, feels that the partnership expresses their individual appreciation of design, and that a contrasting but still complementary seriousness and whimsy coexist. “I have a philosophy in life that everything should balance two extremes,” Distenfeld told Style.com. “[Novick's] pieces are both extremely complex in their geometry and pattern, but at the same time carry elements of simplicity and minimalism.” That duality compelled Distenfeld to lend her hand to the delicate ear pieces with her own wisps of elementary notions, like vivid hues and shapes. From collaboration to conception, the two married their singular vision and inimitable aesthetics through the prism of a rainbow lens, delivering an excitingly refreshing point of view.

Arc en Ciel ranges from $370 to $2,370. The line is available for preorder now on paigenovick.com, and will launch exclusively at Fivestory on May 1. —Alexis Brunswick

Exclusive: The Line Makes a Bid for the Art World

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 14:10

Having barely marked its six-month anniversary, The Line just got one step closer to offering a 360-degree curated life. Vanessa Traina Snow and Morgan Wendelborn’s immaculately edited concept shop has partnered with online database Artsy (which counts Larry Gagosian and John Elderfield among its advisers) to venture into the world of art dealing.

Beginning today, The Line will offer a selection of artworks by the likes of Jeffrey Hoone, Werner Bischof, Sandra Iliescu, and Lauren Seiden. In keeping with the brand’s pared-back approach to lifestyle, the initial collection will be just seventeen pieces. The impetus, as Wendelborn tells it, was an organic one: “We opened [brick-and-mortar counterpart] The Apartment by The Line with our favorite pieces from partners, friends, and family and were getting an overwhelming response from customers who wanted to purchase the works. We’ve always seen [the brand] as an experience our community and customers can engage with on their own terms, so offering art makes [it] that much more holistic.”

Werner Bischof, Swiss Mountain Peaks, 1941, giclée print. Lauren Seiden, Raw Wrap 8, 2014, graphite on paper.

As to walking the often-perilous line between aesthetics and commercial viability, Wendelborn added, “We used our values, stylistic framework, and POV to incorporate the works into the space, so even though we are selling these pieces, it was very important for all of them to have a story, have meaning, and align with the aesthetic of The Apartment by The Line.”

All seventeen pieces will be available for purchase at theline.com and artsy.net, but for those who are just browsing, an installation of the pieces will be on display at The Apartment by The Line beginning today. The exclusive images debut here.

The Apartment by The Line, 76 Greene Street, 3rd Floor, New York City.

—Kristin Anderson

Photo: Courtesy Artsy

Analyzing Helmut Lang’s Lasting Influence

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 11:30

In our new Throwback Thursdays video, Tim Blanks remembers Helmut Lang’s Spring 2005 show, a collection that wound up being the Austrian designer’s last for the label he founded. In the clip, Blanks calls Lang “the master of minimalism—possibly the most influential designer of his time, because what he did was such a clear reaction to what had come before. He changed the way clothes looked. He changed the way shows and models looked.” Now, nearly 10 years later, Lang remains a touchstone for a new generation of designers, who look to develop and interpret his ideas in the same way that a previous generation looked to the work of Yves Saint Laurent.

Watch the Throwback Thursday video with Tim Blanks here.

Here, a slideshow of the ways Lang continues to inspire today.

—Brittany Adams

Watch Sky Ferreira’s New Shoppable Video for “I Blame Myself”

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 21:54


In case there was any doubt that the worlds of music and fashion are becoming increasingly intertwined, Sky Ferreira’s latest video offers more proof. Created by the online retailer SSENSE and System magazine, the visual clip for “I Blame Myself”—a slow-burning, diaristic pop standout from Ferreira’s debut album, Night Time, My Time—is a new breed of music video that allows viewers to shop the clothing worn by the artist. The first entry in this series was Iggy Azalea’s 2012 video for “I Think She Ready.” But while Azalea’s video featured somewhat distracting pop-up tags with links to items of clothing, SSENSE’s newest effort with Ferreira’s “I Blame Myself” is a smoother experience, directing viewers to a landing page where the clothing can be purchased.

Who better to be the champion of this new genre than Sky Ferreira? She’s a natural fit, considering she’s worked between the worlds of music and fashion as a singer and as a model for Saint Laurent, Forever 21, and Redken, among others. Fittingly, in the video she wears clothing from designers who often cite musicians as muses. Among them: Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci, Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, and, of course, Saint Laurent’s Hedi Slimane, who provided the bulk of her wardrobe, from the fashion house’s iconic metallic-dotted tights to a lips-emblazoned chiffon blouse which appeared on the runway for Spring 2014.

“It’s luxe, but it looks like anyone can wear it,” says Ferreira’s stylist Ian Bradley in a behind-the-scenes video, referencing a metallic Saint Laurent crop top.”[Sky's] willing to experiment and have fun with it,” Bradley adds. “No matter what she does, it always looks really cool. You want to be that girl.” —Marissa G. Muller

Marina’s Must-Haves: Leather Overall Shorts From Veda

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 21:07

I‘m in an overalls phase lately. I have one navy pair in heavy cotton from Joseph that I purchased many years ago, and they have a very “grown-up,” polished look to them. Lots of girls have been wearing them in denim lately—a look I also want to try. Browsing through Veda’s collection, I came across this leather version. I wondered for a moment if I’m too old to pull them off, but my Style.com colleagues tell me I’m not. I think I can trust them, but either way, I’m a risk taker, so I’m definitely giving them a shot.

Veda Rian overalls, $664, Buy it now —Marina Larroudé

Kate Middleton: Fashion Maven or Bright Banana?

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 18:42

Continuing her ongoing royal tour, Kate Middleton donned a vivid yellow Spring ’14 Roksanda Ilincic dress during an appearance at Sydney’s Royal Opera House today. While addressing a crowd, Middleton revealed that Prince William told her the dress makes her look like “a banana.” Poor form, Wills. A few days ago, he also reportedly criticized the Duchess’s emerald Erdem coat for being “too bright.” Considering that Prince William has basically worn a variation of the same tired navy-suit-and-red-tie ensemble every day throughout the tour, he should probably lay off. And seeing as Kate was recently dubbed “normcore,” I also think that, if only for the purpose of being cheeky (or even better, stylistically exciting), Kate should test the waters with a few wild getups. How about some Fall ’14 Moschino? Or, if she wanted to embrace the Brits, Meadham Kirchhoff’s latest looks would be a bold choice. Do it to it, Kate, and show the Prince who’s boss—sartorially speaking. —Katharine K. Zarrella

Photo: Getty Images 

Paper Mag’s Kim Hastreiter Records a Rap Song to Celebrate Spring Cheer

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 16:52

Every spring for the past ten years, Paper cofounder, editor, and publisher Kim Hastreiter devotes a page in the magazine to “reasons to be cheerful,” a roundup of zeitgeist moments from fashion and pop culture meant to provide a spring awakening after a long winter. The annual column is inspired by Ian Dury and the Blockheads’ 1979 song of the same name, and although Hastreiter thought herself witty for the throwback reference, it turns out that for the past decade the joke has been on her: “I asked everyone in the office if they got the reference, and all I got were blank stares. Everybody at Paper was born after 1979! Nobody knew what I was talking about!”

So for this year’s addition, Hastreiter went for something a younger generation might understand more easily: a rap. “Fashion can be so, so serious,” she told us. “I hate the fashion mentality ‘one day you’re in, one day you’re out.’ Fashion isn’t one thing. How can someone be a genius one season and not the next? I just wanted to squeeze in as many things as possible to make people smile.” And squeeze them in she did: Despite the unforeseen recording challenge of “just having to speak so quickly,” Hastreiter’s rap contains references to Jeremy Scott’s Moschino debut, Erykah Badu’s Givenchy campaign, and Chanel’s supermarket runway spectacular—all things that have certainly been making us smile lately.

Today, Style.com debuts the song and video from Paper‘s spring issue. Sadly, Hastreiter refused to comment if there would be more raps in her future. But who knows? “I love the power of the Internet. Anyone can do anything. Even I can make a rap song and put it out. The Internet gives power to the people.”

—Todd Plummer

Mary Katrantzou for Adidas Originals Is Coming

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 15:01

In case there was any doubt: The sneaker trend in fashion isn’t going anywhere. Thank Adidas for that. News recently broke that the sportswear label has teamed up with Pharrell Williams for a long-term partnership, and it was announced today that Mary Katrantzou is designing a capsule collection of Adidas Originals footwear and apparel. That’s a lot to look forward to.

The London-based Katrantzou is known around the globe for her innovative digital prints, so we’re anticipating plenty of bold colors and graphic motifs—but if last week’s interview with the designer told us anything, it’s to expect the unexpected. She’s been moving away from kaleidoscopic prints and exploring more pared-back ideas, and this high-street partnership may be the perfect opportunity to experiment.

The Adidas Originals by Mary Katrantzou collection hits stores this November. Calendars marked. —Emily Farra

Photo: Getty Images

Dressing for Fame: Petra Flannery on Styling Hollywood’s Elite

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 14:35

If celebrity status is conferred in red-carpet appearances, then no actress today can compete without the help of just the right stylist. As Kerry Washington once told Glamour after she noticeably upped the sartorial ante, “There were a couple of actresses whom I felt were having the upper hand careerwise—because they knew how to work that red carpet.” A carefully crafted collaboration between stylist and client, the perfect look can create an indelible impact on agents, casting directors, and those of us watching from the sidelines. Straight from the epicenter of all things celebrity, we’ve asked some of the industry’s top stylists to share their experiences and impressions from their perch above Tinseltown. With our new Dressing for Fame series, we bring you an exclusive, insider look at everything it takes to create those iconic moments captured by a million photo flashes.

Petra Flannery

While Emma Stone has been busy crisscrossing the globe, making head-turning appearances promoting The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Zoe Saldana has just been named the newest face of L’Oréal Paris. And those are just two of the high-profile, red-carpet fixtures whom stylist Petra Flannery counts as clients. Known for her unwavering kindness and penchant for bold, statement-making ensembles, Flannery has relied heavily on her unabashed love of fashion and disciplined approach to shape the relationships she’s formed with stars like Amy Adams, Mila Kunis, and Faith Hill. Her unrelenting schedule and seemingly unbreakable track record have placed her on The Hollywood Reporter‘s Most Powerful Stylists list—and at the top or No. 2 for the past three years running, no less. On the road with Stone, Flannery stole some time away to talk to Style.com exclusively about when she knew she’d made it, what it takes to make it work, and why she still loves the hunt for that perfect dress.

When did you first begin styling?
I began styling over ten years ago.

What was your “made it” moment?
Zoe Saldana wearing Givenchy Haute Couture at the 2010 Oscars. I saw it when the show hit Style.com and I instantly knew it was her dress. The Givenchy team met us in Europe while we were there for work and the rest is history. It was truly a fashion moment.

What is your favorite red-carpet moment to date?
There are many I hold close to me because each has a journey. Right now I’m loving Emma Stone in yellow Versace for the 2014 London premiere of Spider-Man.

What is the most unexpected thing you do behind the scenes for clients?
Trying on clothes myself or making my sister, who works with me, try them on. She’s my muse. It really helps to have an understanding of what a garment is like on yourself so you can see it from a real perspective. It’s extremely useful to see the clothes on prior to fittings and have an understanding of their workings.

What’s your look launchpad? How do you begin the process?
I begin my launchpad process by looking up designers that fit my clients’ profiles. I look for the right shapes, and then colors, patterns, and prints. I have to marry my taste to what my clients prefer—always thinking outside the box, though.

What’s your favorite thing to do once the look is out the door?
Honestly, my favorite thing to do is relax and take a deep breath. The work is done.

What’s your everyday stylist’s necessity?
My iPhone/iPad. My job is very visual, so these tools help me, as I can access Style.com on the go. I also keep photo albums from all of my fittings. I constantly use these pictures for reference to fine-tune alterations, as well as to complete a look with jewelry and accessories.

What’s your personal style mantra and how does it affect the way you dress?
My mantra is “modern, clean, and classic.” For work I’m almost uniform-like: ballet flats, cashmere cardigans, and essentials from The Row. I love fashion, and I personally take a minimalist approach.

Zoe Saldana just signed with L’Oréal Paris. Do you think this will affect her style? And how closely do you work with the client’s makeup artist?
It’s very exciting that Zoe just signed on with L’Oréal. This heightens her visibility as an actress and as a brand ambassador. We’ll continue to uphold her fashion status on the red carpet, and as usual push the envelope. I hope it means even more red-carpet appearances.

When it comes to working with makeup artists, yes, I work closely with them. It’s great to have an input on the overall appearance of a client’s look. So much involves color and pairing the two. It’s nice when hair, makeup, and styling can have creative moments as a team. It really shows.

What advice would you give for someone trying to emulate star style?
Be your own star. Create your own personal style. Take your favorite pieces and blend them with what you love from a certain star’s style. Make it unique but subtle—being fashionable is not being loud. Some of the most stylish people are those who can create with the basics.

If you could swap styles with one client, who would it be and why?
It’s hard to choose a particular client. They all have aspects that I want to have, like skin tone so flawless that they can wear plunging necklines and midriff tops, or an incredible way of wearing unique and unexpected colors…the list goes on. I think the beauty of my job is that I’m around all of these smart and creative women. They are very confident in what they like. I love each of their styles because they are very individual. I guess secretly I take a little of everyone’s style and incorporate it into mine. I’m always trying new ideas and looks, so I get personally inspired. —Alexis Brunswick

Photo: Getty Images 

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