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Updated: 10 hours 51 min ago

Surgical Foot Face-lifts—Just Part of the “Real World”

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 22:08

Think Chinese foot binding died out with the Qing Dynasty? Think again! According to a report in The New York Times, well-to-do women are seeking out plastic surgery so their tootsies can painlessly slip into high-fashion kicks by the likes of Christian Louboutin, Nicholas Kirkwood, and Manolo Blahnik. “On the surface, it looked shallow,” offered podiatrist Dr. Ali Sadrieh, who performs a variety of face-lifts for the feet. “But I came to see she needs these shoes to project confidence, they are part of her outside skin. That’s the real world.” I’d have to imagine that his definition of the “real world” is a loose one or, at the very least, exclusive to moneyed locales like Park Avenue and Beverly Hills.

Wouldn’t commissioning custom shoes or, maybe, petitioning designers to make more wearable stilettos be ever-so-slightly less shallow, not to mention less expensive? You could also try my (only mildly less ridiculous) method of choice—foot Pilates—for which I’m frequently, and rightly, laughed at by my friends. Even better, you could just buy Prada, who, thanks to its embrace of wide soles, makes some of the most comfortable skyscrapers on the planet. —Katharine K. Zarrella

Photo: Cesare Medri  

Marina’s Must-Haves: Madewell’s Poncho Dress

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 21:25

My mind is in vacation mode—all I want to think about is summer days at the beach. For my seaside getaways, I like my outfits to be as simple as can be, and oversize cotton pieces are a must. Madewell’s white poncho dress will be in my suitcase for my next trip. Its graphic details make it city-appropriate as well, for those hot days in June. At the moment, summer seems but a dream, but as someone who likes to plan ahead, I’ll be ordering Madewell’s frock this week.

Madewell poncho dress, $138, Buy it now —Marina Larroudé

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

EXCLUSIVE: Virgil Abloh Debuts Off-White for Women

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 19:39

Virgil Abloh spends a lot of time in the air. One day he’s busy globe-trotting for his full-time gig as Kanye West’s creative director, and the next he’s jetting off to Miami to represent Been Trill with a DJ set at Ultra Music Festival. In recent months, the 33-year-old Chicago native has been squeezing in trips to Milan, where he operates the atelier for his ready-to-wear label, Off-White, which premiered its Spring ’14 men’s range back in December.

Building his new brand is Abloh’s most personal project to date. His solo career as a designer began with his short-lived Pyrex Vision capsule of graphic tees and hoodies that quickly gained a fervent cult underground following. But he’s elevating the streetwear conversation altogether with Off-White, which is being championed by upscale retailers including Colette, Barneys, and Selfridges. The clothes themselves are marked by their worn-in, shabby chic-meets-street appeal, and often tagged with Off-White’s signature diagonal stripes that speak to Abloh’s passion for art and architecture.

Abloh recently conceived one of the sets for pal Sky Ferreira, who is the opening act on Miley Cyrus’ Bangerz tour. His stage scheme involves a grid of intersecting lasers, and Ferreira wears a custom Off-White biker jacket cut from neoprene and embellished with 30,000 black Swarovski crystals. The jacket is also in Ferreira’s new, shoppable music video for “I Blame Myself.”

That one-off Perfecto paved the way for Off-White’s first foray into womenswear for Fall ’14. Its corresponding lookbook, which was shot at the Barcelona Pavilion in Spain (designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who is a perennial source of inspiration for Abloh), debuts here on Style.com. The feminine side of Off-White is less street, more refined, and definitely influenced by the bohemian moodiness of Hedi Slimane with its wide-brimmed hats, fringed wool coats, velvet maxi skirts, and pumps offered, in addition to the now-trademark faded denim and branded biker jackets. During a phone interview over the weekend, Abloh discussed his evolving vision for Off-White, youth culture, his collaboration with Ferreira, and more.

—Brittany Adams

How has launching Off-White allowed you to evolve your point of view?

It’s interesting now having the brand. It’s kind of like an onion, rolling back the layers of what does Off-White mean. And Off-White to me just means “now.” My reference points are: It’s a culture, it’s a lifestyle, it’s kids. It’s, like, same social circle—like, all my friends, I love their personal style. I think the main thing is that Off-White is a sort of attempt to represent youth culture and young lifestyle in the marketplace of established fashion brands. For me, it’s a way to show the world—from my vantage point as a hip-hop kid—that image of fashion. I’ve designed for quite some time. I have a background in architecture, so I’ve always been trying to find an outlet for all these ideas.

What is your womenswear aesthetic?

I just want chic, plus Air Force 1s. My guy friends dress in more of a streetwear manner, and my girlfriends dress in Céline or Saint Laurent. It’s very, like, Chateau Marmont, Café Select, The Mercer [Hotel], to [The] Westway, to 1 Oak, so I just merge all that. The most exciting part for me now is to just lay out this women’s world, and I see it as more of a boyfriend-girlfriend type relationship. The title of the women’s collection this season is “I Only Smoke When I Drink.” It’s a sentence that relates to that girl I imagine wearing the clothes.

Tell me about recently working with Sky Ferreira.

I’ve known Sky maybe for, like, a year and a half or so, just through being friends, kind of being in the same sort of circle of friends and creative kids, trying to make a mark. And it’s very cool—she is such a talented person and such a muse. I was immediately drawn to that. We have tons of similar likes and whatnot, so it all sort of organically happened. It all started, I think, with the stage production for her, and organically that led into a twofold concept where it was like, let’s merge the aesthetic of the stage with a fashion piece that kind of integrates it, kind of making it more 3-D. We both kind of naturally were inspired by Michael Jackson. [laughs] Everyone at some point tries to get out some Michael Jackson dream of their life.

Are you a fan of her music?

Super. I’ve always been a fan of many music genres outside of hip-hop and people’s music that is supremely natural talent, and she is that. Like, her charisma, her stage presence, and her off-stage presence are very intriguing. She symbolizes a lot for her culture, and I think authenticity and rock music is a thing that’s not common, so that’s what makes me a fan of her. Her personality—that’s what draws me to her. And her music, her sound, and what she puts into it is amazing to me.

Going back to the clothing, you referenced Martha Stewart and Montauk as influencing your first menswear collection, which was called “Youth Will Always Win.” Are you keeping that look moving into next season?

[laughs] Yeah, I’m super into that still. That’s a part of my personality, so I’m still on that sort of aesthetic—I’m not ready to move from it so fast. But I have a different theme building for the men’s. It’s all this Baja surf-inspired collection. It’s very coastal still—it’s more like Cali, and it’s called “Moving Still” and it’s about waves. It’s a graphic story, but then it’s also this sort of hippie, poncho-wearing, drug rug interpretation. In order for me to be happy with the season, there has to be a cool name to it. It has to have a theme, but then still the graphic-based aesthetic and prints on clothes.

Have you ever surfed?

I have. It’s kind of one of those things where you try to learn a new hobby. I’m 33, so I like the idea of forcing yourself to learn something completely new.

In general, how do you stay inspired?

The zeitgeist is what inspires me, this sort of collective thought of trends and how they move to different cities—what kids in Paris are talking about or what music they’re listening to. You find similarities in between Ultra and Café Select—the conversations are pretty similar.

What are your ultimate goals for Off-White as a fashion brand?

My goal is to transcend outside of the streetwear and surprise people in a way. I’m very honored to be selling at the stores that I’m at. These are the places that I love, so the goal for me is to intersect with a wider audience and just be a representative of what’s happening in the street but have that square footage in the stores to kind of attract new fashion consumers.

Speaking of, do you ever miss doing Pyrex Vision, or were you just over that?

My whole idea from the beginning was that it was sort of a limited thing—I wasn’t that into repeating and keep making that product. I have this whole obsession with collecting early Raf Simons pieces, and I like that the brand for myself, Pyrex, has a definitive start. I like that people who are fans of that can seek out and find that piece and it’ll feel nostalgic in a way.

So much of your professional career has been about collaborating. How does it feel to express your own vision with Off-White?

That’s mainly why I kind of wanted to start Off-White in this way, because I’ve been very collaborative in my whole design career, so I had to remind myself, like, what’s my own favorite color? That’s kind of where the name came from—just sort of a reminder to myself because it helps me in collaborative projects, too, like, this is my specific opinion without having to compromise it. I can paint a whole world, so to speak, so that’s what Off-White is to me. I’m honored to have a platform to create in. I’m just fulfilling a trend that I see on the street and things—just fulfilling a niche to be a young, credible designer with valid ideas.

Off-White’s Fall ’14 women’s collection ($180 to $2,000) will be available at select retailers including Browns, Colette, Selfridges, and The Webster. For more information, visit off—white.com. Photos: Christina Paik / Courtesy of Off-White

Phoebe Philo and Natalie Massenet Make Time‘s 100 List

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 19:30

Among Time‘s list of the world’s 100 most influential people, which was revealed today, you’ll find Pope Francis, Rand Paul, Beyoncé, Hillary Clinton…and two fashion powerhouses: Céline creative director Phoebe Philo and Net-a-Porter founder Natalie Massenet. The fashion icons appear in the annual issue alongside tributes written by fellow industry leaders. Stella McCartney penned a story about Philo, in which she writes, “One of the few female designers, she celebrates the simple and champions the quality and reality of a woman’s wardrobe. One of the things we share is the reality that the clothes we design are actually worn.” J.Crew president Jenna Lyons, who made the 100 List last year, scribed Massenet’s tribute, calling her a “visionary.” The issue will hit newsstands on Friday, and 2014′s winners will be honored at the annual gala on Tuesday evening. —Emily Farra

Photo: Nick Harvey/ Getty Images 

EXCLUSIVE: Très Bien Debuts First-Ever Collection for Spring

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 19:12

Since opening Très Bien in 2006, brothers Hannes and Simon Hogeman have been helping to lead the direction of style for men all over the world. The Stockholm-based shop has become one of the most influential outlets for streetwear, high fashion, and the tricky intersection between the two. In fact, Très Bien is that intersection.

“It all comes down to our taste,” says Hannes, “which stems from growing up in Sweden with a general interest in fashion, style, and culture. We were brought up in the nineties with Helmut Lang and Ice Cube.”

But the real magic of Très Bien isn’t just taste, it’s a sensibility for how to create juxtapositions that work—how Stussy and Rick Owens can intermingle, or Nike and Tim Coppens, Carhartt and Comme des Garçons. The e-boutique’s selection is as important as the styling decisions. Pairing high and low is not a radical new idea in fashion by any means, but Très Bien has mastered the formula. “When we started out we wanted to do our thing and incorporate all these elements,” says Simon, “mixing high fashion and streetwear with youth culture, art, and music references. It’s more common now, but when we started out ten years ago, only some magazines like i-D represented something similar.” Now they’re going to see how far they can push it.

“We wanted to do our own collection all along,” Hannes says. “But we wanted to create a platform first, our own world with rules and standards distinct from the fashion world at large.” Seen exclusively here on Style.com first and available next week at tres-bien.com, the Spring 2014 collection is an amalgamation of all the things Très Bien has been championing: smart, luxurious, relaxed menswear with distinct design cues that mash up clean lines, bold graphics, and simple styling. The collection will also feature a special collaboration with Common Projects, a canvas with gum-sole Achilles sneaker.

“What it boils down to,” says Hannes, “is we want to express ourselves and what we’re about—the collection is 100 percent Très Bien.”

—Noah Johnson

Pharrell’s Stylist Mariel Haenn on the Ubiquitous Star’s Fashion Sense

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 15:24

Vivienne Westwood’s Mountain Hat. An Adidas track jacket. A pair of Stan Smiths. With those clues, you already know who we’re talking about—even if you’ve only briefly glimpsed at pop culture this year. So far this has been the Year of Pharrell, with the singer-producer-serial collaborator gracing every imaginable award show, network, and stage, hat in tow. What you might not know is that Pharrell Williams’ recent style evolution is not entirely of his own making—he’s had help along the way from stylist duo Rob Zangardi and Mariel Haenn, who had their big break with Rihanna’s iconic “Umbrella” video in 2007.

Zangardi and Haenn have assisted Pharrell since January with everything from his Coachella set attire to the video for “Marilyn Monroe,” which premiered yesterday. In the fantasy-staged visual, as he serenades myriad ladies, Pharrell gets even more mileage out of his hat in an impressive array of colors, provided by Westwood. One even has a lemon-sized hole, cut personally by Pharrell. We caught up with Haenn over the phone to talk about Pharrell’s DIY fashion sense, how well-loved he is by designers, and his next possible fashion statement.

—Marissa G. Muller

What kind of direction did Pharrell give you when you started working together?
We got a couple of verbal directives about what he likes: a Wes Anderson vibe for the color palette, woodsy and Boy Scout but not literal—not like patches on the shirt—rugged, chic, and polished yet still very wearable. Not flashy at all.

Did the “Boy Scout” cue prompt his Vivienne Westwood hat?
The hat was totally him. We can’t take any credit for that. It was initially inspired by another hip-hop group from the eighties [The World's Famous Supreme Team and Malcolm McLaren's video for their 1982 collaborative single "Buffalo Gals"]. When he sees something he likes, it just clicks and he figures out how to make it a staple.

At this point, does he consider the hat to be his signature?
I think so. He’s gotten so much recognition. I’ve even seen a hat shaped like his cut out of a piece of toast with a red Comme des Garçons heart out of ketchup on Instagram. When you see any hat shaped like that, you automatically associate it with Pharrell, which I think is really smart.

Were you, Rob, and Pharrell surprised by all of the hat jokes that came after he wore it?
Not at all. It was kind of expected. When something is different, there’s a lot to be said about it. But he doesn’t take any of it to heart. He’s comfortable with who he is, so it doesn’t matter what anyone says or thinks. As far as creating an iconic stamp, I think it will be forever his thing. Now he’s doing different colors. We even cut a hole in his hat for the video and the hat he wore at Coachella as well. So he’s finding different ways of doing it.

What’s it like to style someone who’s so involved in the business of fashion?
We love it. He knows what he likes. He paints on his Adidas Stan Smith sneakers, and he’ll bring them over like, “Look at what I brought. Can we figure it out together?” For the “Marilyn Monroe” video, he kept wanting to wear his own thing, but we had so many racks. We were like, “Look what we have.” I think he likes us because we understand his vision and push him—because he’s comfortable with wearing whatever he wore on set for a video. When we met him, he was like, “I’ve never worked with stylists before, but I want to work with you guys.” The only time he had worked with a stylist was when a magazine forced him to, but he was like, “You guys get it.”

Did he paint the shorts he wore to Coachella?
Totally. On our first shoot together, we got a call from someone on his team saying, “We’re going to grab some Sharpie markers. He’s feeling inspired.” He used the Sharpie markers to paint and color his shoes, which was awesome.

In your line of work, is it unusual for a client to be so hands-on?
Yeah, he’s different because he likes to customize his own thing. Jennifer Lopez is pretty involved. She has a good sense of what she wants to do, but she also trusts us to help bring it to fruition. But no one is hands-on, DIY like him.

What’s been the biggest challenge of working with Pharrell?
He’s so specific, wants to be different, and likes dressing down. So we have to find more interesting ways for him to dress casual and still have it be an iconic statement for a video or performance. Usually in videos, people go over the top more than they do in real life, but he just wants to look like himself—we want to make it video-worthy.

How did his shorts suit by Lanvin come about for the Oscars?
He has a really good relationship with Alber [Elbaz]. We didn’t have anything to do with that, but I think it was genius. Nobody would ever do that. The fact that he’s done it is kind of adorable.

For the “Marilyn Monroe” video, was there one stylistic theme?
No, we had to figure out different looks for the different setups. The treatment was really detailed with a lot of different scenarios, so it was tricky to figure out. We had something else planned for the red, white, and blue room, but right before we shot the scene we realized the red, white, and blue striped sweater would work better.

Were there other last-minute changes you had to make?
We had to custom-make an arrow that looked like he got shot in the heart but wouldn’t fall as he walked and danced—and only had one day to do it. So we called a prop guy who we’ve worked with. I don’t want to give away our secrets, but it was basically held on by a magnet. It was kind of like a necklace magnet, but we made it look like we poked a hole in his shirt where the arrow hit.

Have a lot of designers approached you about dressing Pharrell?
When we started doing requests for him on the first job, we quickly found out that everybody is into him. Since he loves fashion and is known for his great collaboration, I kind of figured everybody would be. I was excited to learn how much Chanel enjoys working with him. They did a collaboration where he custom-made a necklace for himself—he wears it in the video. Chanel, Lorraine Schwartz, Hoorsenbuhs, and Ofira are pretty much his go-tos for jewelry.

Where do you look for inspiration?
Everywhere. It could come from movies, fabric patterns—I’m outside right now looking at a building that has four different colors of paint on it. It’s pretty much anywhere we go. I think I, Rob, and Pharrell work that way. Our moodboard has turned into photostreams on our iPhones since we’re always on the run.

What were the last images you exchanged?
Smaller details like wearing a feather pin instead of a bow tie or tie. A suede string tassel keychain but superlong. We really like details, especially when you’re dressing someone who wants to be dressed down. It’s the little details that make someone stand out.

Photo: WireImage

Gia Coppola on Family Film School and Teenage Ennui

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 14:50

The next Coppola force to be reckoned with—at least according to Zac Posen—Gia, granddaughter of Francis, niece of Sofia, has officially entered the family business with her debut feature film, Palo Alto, starring Emma Roberts and James Franco. Based on Franco’s book Palo Alto: Stories, the film follows a clique of disaffected high schoolers as they quietly booze and grind their way through the glory days. In advance of today’s premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival, Coppola found time to chat with Style.com about directing her mom, learning from her family, and incorporating her own closet into the shoot. —Katie Van Syckle

You met James Franco at a party in L.A. What’s it like meeting James Franco for the first time?
I had always been a big fan of his, and my mom had met him while I was in college. She was raving about how nice and intelligent he was. Then I was at a deli with some friends and I saw him there. Later that night I crashed some Hollywood party and I saw him, and my mom dragged him over and he remembered me from earlier that afternoon. He asked me about my photography, and we stayed in touch. I sent him all my photographs, and he sent me his book. He wanted to make it into a movie, long story short.

Does the world of Palo Alto have anything in common with your teen years?
Yes, emotionally, there’s that weird age where you’re too young to be an adult and too old to be a kid and you’re trying to figure out what you want.

Do you relate to the ennui?
I just remember that most of the time you’re looking for something to do, but usually in those moments you’re having the most fun when you’re hanging out in the parking lot and driving around.

What was it like directing your mother?
It was funny because she just kept spiking the camera at the end of every scene and looking at me to see if she did an OK job. It took a while to convince her to do it.

How would you describe your own film education?
I really learned a lot when I worked on my grandpa’s film Twixt and got to be with him start to finish and sit next to him every day. That was my film school.

What was the most valuable piece of advice your grandfather gave you?
He’s always spitting out these amazing quotes. Even just something as simple as eat your breakfast because you need sugar in the morning to get your brain thinking. And be open to your actors’ ideas because they know the characters better than you.

You worked on your aunt’s film Somewhere, in the costume department. How did that prepare you for making this project?
It was nice to just see how Sofia works and her own demeanor that is true to herself, and you don’t have to be this big, authoritative figure. I don’t think I would have thought about directing if I had not seen her do it as a young woman.

The tone and the palate of Palo Alto reminds me a little bit of Somewhere. Is that a coincidence?
Well, we’re of the same blood and I look up to her, so maybe I just can’t help but subconsciously kind of be influenced by her work.

I imagine it would be tricky to have such an amazing resource and not want to take advantage of it. Did you reach out to her?
It was really important for me to figure out my own voice and not feel influenced by anyone else’s opinions, so I really just kind of discussed it with James as my mentor. I didn’t want to kind of get pulled in many different directions—[I wanted to] figure out how to do this on my own.

How did you want to create the feel of high school with its fashion?
So many of the kids on television have really nice clothes, perfect skin and hair. I just really wanted to see a movie that felt authentic to what I observe when I’m watching teenagers out in public. Jack [Kilmer] has really awesome style to begin with, so he just kind of wore his clothes, and I used some of my clothes because we were low budget.

Which pieces of your clothes made it into the film?
Emma has some of my clothes. I wore that yellow vintage sweatshirt on set, and my mom was like, “That’d be a good sweater for Emma, yellow will look good on camera.” So I just took it off and put it on her.

What are you working on now?
I’m writing two different ideas, and I hope that maybe I can work with James again.

Are you thinking of teenagers?
I love the subject matter of teenagers, but next time around I’d like to try something different. Plus, I’m so attached to my teenagers from Palo Alto I can’t imagine working with anyone else.

Photo: Sam Deitch/BFAnyc.com

Cheap Fashion Thrills

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 11:15

Looking to make a high-fashion impact on a shoestring budget? The recent runways stand as proof that all you need to tap into the momentary zeitgeist is a little creativity, not a maxed-out credit card. Take, for example, the pretty young thing caught posing with a McDonald’s cup during Sydney fashion week like it was a piece from Jeremy Scott’s fast-food-inspired collection for Moschino. Meanwhile, Chanel’s supermarket sweep of a Fall show convinced us that even grocery carts can be glamorous (especially if they’re being pushed by Rihanna, Cara Delevingne, and Joan Smalls). Ditto goes for Anya Hindmarch’s luxe “Have a Nice Day” bags modeled after those handed out at convenience stores. Other cheap styling tricks we’re eager to try out soon include pinning a violet to our furs à la Fendi and securing our ponytails with dollar-bin scrunchies like Dree Hemingway did in Trager Delaney’s latest lookbook.

Click for a slideshow of Fall’s affordable styling tricks.

—Brittany Adams

Lupita Nyong’o Named World’s Most Beautiful

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 22:28

Lupita Nyong’o has a growing awards collection (including an Oscar), but she “never dreamed” she would be named People magazine’s Most Beautiful Person. The 12 Years a Slave star and Lancôme spokeswoman appears on this month’s cover with her trademark cropped hair, a sparkly necklace, and her perpetual smile. “I was happy for all the girls who would see me on [it] and feel a little more seen,” she told People. Growing up, her idea of beauty was “light skin and long, flowing, straight hair…Subconsciously you start to appreciate those things more than what you possess.” Now her natural beauty is not only celebrated but further enhanced by her innate elegance, humility, and originality. Nyong’o joins an impressive roster of past winners including Julia Roberts, Beyoncé, Jennifer Aniston, Halle Berry, and Angelina Jolie. —Emily Farra

Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage 

Miranda Kerr Proves Model-Slash-Actress Is So Last Season

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 21:38

It would seem that model-slash-singer is overtaking the age-old model-slash-actress label—particularly among Victoria’s Secret supermodels. First, Cara Delevingne proved she’s more than a few goofy faces when she sang “I Want Candy” for a Katie Grand x Hogan video. Then, Gisele Bündchen lent her talents to not one, but two H&M commercials, most recently covering Blondie’s “Heart of Glass.”. And today, Bobby Fox released a cover of Elvis Presley’s “You’re the Boss,” with Miranda Kerr (OK, she’s a former V.S. model, but still…) taking over Ann-Margret’s part. While the song lacks Elvis and Ann-Margret’s palpable chemistry, we have to hand it to Kerr: Her voice does sound supersweet (listen here, below). Turns out, she’s had a little practice. Back in 2012, she sang a tune for a (slightly bizarre) Japanese commercial for Lipton Iced Tea. Maybe The Voice should start filming a models-only segment? —Emily Farra

Photo: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com 

Boy George’s Night Out in New York

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 20:08

Around midnight last night, guests gathered at The Top of The Standard for a private reception for Boy George, who had just wrapped a one-night-only performance at Irving Plaza. “It’s like the eighties in here,” Victoria Bartlett told us as she walked in. And perhaps it was the eighties all over again: A rare stateside visit from Boy George means that companions from the glory days of nightlife will come out of the woodwork. Sandra Long wore a signature white fur coat and feathered headpiece, and hosts Miss Guy and Erich Long greeted guests from their banquette near the front.

“I remember getting dressed up with my sisters as kids and dancing in front of the mirror to Boy George, pretending we were grown women!” Ladyfag told us, her thick eyeliner no doubt a tribute to “Karma Chameleon.” The evening drew in a range of Boy George fans young and old, including the likes of Peter Brant Jr., Julia Restoin Roitfeld, and Rachel Chandler. On the dance floor, husband-wife duo Catherine Martin and Baz Luhrmann danced up a storm until late into the night. You’re welcome in New York whenever you like, Boy George—it seems like your fan base has only grown. —Todd Plummer

Photo: Sam Deitch/BFAnyc.com

Catherine Middleton: Duchess of the Decks

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 18:40

More pseudo-news—sartorial and otherwise—unfolds as the Royals continue their Australian tour. Today, Kate Middleton joined the ranks of social butterflies-cum-music mavens like Chelsea Leyland, Hannah Bronfman, Harley Viera-Newton, and Mia Moretti after being taught how to DJ at an Australian youth center. Naturally, this all happened while she was donning a baby pink McQueen suit. Maybe The Misshapes will ring the Palace if they’re looking to turn their trendy trio into a titled quartet. Then again, maybe they won’t. —Katharine K. Zarrella

Photo: Getty Images 

Marina’s Must-Haves: Valentino’s Personalized Leather Jacket

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 17:14

I’m looking for a colorful jacket to wear this spring. By now, I’m exhausted by my dark clothes—even my favorite black motorcycle jacket that I wear every day and night. I’m looking for a colorful leather topper that will remain a classic wardrobe staple for seasons to come. In my opinion, red is a neutral tone that you can wear all year long. And with that in mind, there’s no one in the industry who does the shade better than Valentino—the famous Valentino Red. Part of the Absolute Rouge Signature Collection, this motorcycle jacket can be customized with studs, any of the twenty-six letters of the alphabet, and/or eight symbols offered. So feel free to add stars, little hearts, your own initials, and so on. The same treatment can be given to a selection of rouge shoes, bags, and small leather goods. This is what I call taking personalization to the next level.

Valentino Red biker jacket, $6,690, available exclusively in Valentino stores or at valentino.com. —Marina Larroudé

Photo: Courtesy of Valentino

Z Zegna to Get a Moment in the Spotlight at Pitti Uomo 86

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 16:46

Pitti Immagine announced today that Z Zegna will be this year’s Guest Designer, an honor that comes with a special presentation for the collection during the fair, opening June 16. Designer Paul Surridge’s effort to modernize the Zegna brand seems to be paying off, as he joins past Guest Designers including Kenzo, Carven, and Damir Doma. That puts Surridge in position to carry the torch for cool, forward-looking menswear at this year’s show. Gaetano Marzotto, president of Pitti Immagine, had this to say: “This young and innovative collection reinterprets formalwear by combining it with sporty materials and themes inspired by city lifestyles, and therefore, is very much in tune with the entire cutting-edge area of our fair.”

Additionally, this year marks the sixtieth anniversary of Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana, and to celebrate, Pitti will host a series of events throughout Florence with famed Florentine designers Salvatore Ferragamo, Gucci, Emilio Pucci, Roberto Cavalli, and Ermanno Scervino.

—Noah Johnson Photo: Photo Umberto Fratini / Indigitalimages.Com

Announcing: The BFC/GQ Designer Menswear Fund Shortlist

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 15:51

Today, the British Fashion Council announced the shortlist for the annual BFC/GQ Menswear Designer Fund: Christopher Raeburn, Christopher Shannon, E. Tautz, Lou Dalton, and Richard Nicoll (left). The Fund will provide one of the designers with a bespoke mentoring support program over one year, a £150,000 grant to take their business to the next level, and £50,000 in kind services. The BFC looks for labels that have been trading for at least three years and retail in the U.K. as well as internationally. The winner of the Fund will be announced before the next London Collections: Men shows, which are scheduled for June 15 through 17.

“The shortlisted designers are testament to the extraordinary array of talent in the menswear industry in Britain right now,” said Dylan Jones, editor in chief of British GQ and chair of LC:M. “The current generation of British menswear designers might be the best ever, as they not only have creativity in abundance, but also a keen business sense.” —Emily Farra

Photo: Catwalking.com 

DSM Brings Moynat to the Big Apple

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 14:26

There’s much to be said for the luxury of the discreet, something Moynat has in spades. Sans screaming logos, and even sans advertisements, the Parisian luggage label has made its name on the weight of an impressive heritage. Now, after more than a century and a half, the brand will make its first foray into the stateside market, with a temporary ground-floor boutique in New York’s Dover Street Market. The space opens tomorrow.

Since its inception in 1849, Moynat has enjoyed a storied history as a malletier alongside counterparts Goyard and Vuitton, outfitting Europe’s upper echelons with bespoke trunks. Long before Mulberry’s Alexa, Marc’s Stam, or even the Birkin, there was Moynat’s Réjane, a handbag en homage to celebrated Belle Epoque actress Gabrielle Réjane. But by the latter half of the 20th century, the tide had turned. The grande dame Parisian boutique shuttered in the mid-seventies and Moynat languished more or less in obscurity until being acquired by LVMH in 2010. Since then, CEO Guillaume Davin and artistic director Ramesh Nair have been tasked with reacquainting the world with the house’s former glory. First up was a 2,150-square-foot flagship at 348 Rue Saint-Honoré, which bowed in 2011. Nair has paid particular attention to a sense of joie de vivre, whipping up a sumptuous valise specifically to house the macarons of Pierre Hermé and an opulent, bicycle-mounted picnic case for those who would take their lunch alongside the Seine. A first international boutique opened its doors in London just a month ago, and tomorrow, Midtown East.

Le Moynat Trunk Show (a tribute to the brand’s historic “caravan” approach to presenting their wares abroad) has made stops previously at the Galeries Lafayette in Paris and Isetan Shinjuku in Tokyo. Along with a bevy of other goods, the Dover Street installment will feature two one-off, hand-painted Quattro bags inspired by New York. “We wanted to blend into [the space] and at the same time tell a story, because for us the most important element in debuting in New York is to share a bit of our history and show our values,” Davin says. Happily, Comme des Garçons CEO Adrian Joffe and his team have endeavored to make that as liberating an experience as possible. “We give them a space and a few health and safety rules, and then leave them complete freedom to do what they want. We urge them to be creative and to be freer than they would be normally. We encourage them to ignore corporate constraints where possible.”

While the pairing of famously cutting-edge DSM and a historic brand unfazed by trend or the passage of time may seem incongruous at first glance, Joffe is quick to dismiss any naysaying. “The juxtaposition of heritage and strong fashion is a very important part of Dover Street Market, just as is the clashing of luxury and streetwear, the iconic and the iconoclastic, the simple and the more complicated—all go toward the aim of an exciting shopping experience through the realization of beautiful chaos. Creative, visionary people do not need borders and boundaries and categorization.”

Le Moynat Trunk Show will be open at Dover Street Market New York, located at 160 Lexington Avenue, from April 24 to June 22. —Kristin Anderson

Photos: Courtesy Photos

At LN-CC, Spring Has Sprung

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 07:30

LN-CC is more than an impossibly cool Dalston concept store offering everything from Lanvin and Rick Owens to vintage books and records—it’s a creative family. Most of the people who have worked with the shop since it opened in 2010 are still on board—a fact that’s clearly visible in the boutique’s Spring ’14 campaign, which debuts exclusively here. Lensed by Rory van Millingen in Italy’s Carrara marble quarries, the shoot stars Gigi Jeon, who poses in LN-CC’s Spring merch. “It’s kind of the LN-CC philosophy,” explained John Skelton, the store’s founder and creative director. “Some of the buyers and stylists have been working with us since they were teenagers. Rory was just starting out when he first shot for us, and now he’s becoming a bit of a name in London. And Gigi is our house model. We found her working at a Marc Jacobs store and thought she looked amazing. But she’s so busy now, she even walked in Louis Vuitton!” he said proudly. There’s also a new member joining the LN-CC clan this season: model Max E. “This is literally his first job,” said Skelton. “He’s from Düsseldorf, and he looks unbelievable. I really think he’s going to be the next big face.”

When asked why he chose to shoot at the quarry, Skelton told us that he loved the sci-fi, futuristic effect the backdrop offered. However, getting there was no easy task. “I don’t know how high up we were, but it was above the clouds. It was quite difficult getting all the product and makeup up there. But it was worth it.” We’d have to agree. Featuring wares from Paco Rabanne, Rick Owens, Yang Li, Acne Studios, Lanvin, and more, the shoot perfectly embodies the mix-and-match LN-CC look.

LN-CC’s Spring buys are available now on its website, as the store is currently closed for renovations—the first step in a change-in-gears for LN-CC. After having fallen on hard times this past winter, the store has recently signed a deal with Italian company The Level Group, with the aim of amping up efficiency and profits. “It’s a good marriage. They’ve come in to increase the productivity of the business side, and we get to keep going with the creative side.” As for the London-based outpost’s renovations, we’ve been told that there’s quite a lot in the pipeline for the updated space, which will open in September. “It’s been a major development for us. It’s all up from here.” —Katharine K. Zarrella Photo: Rory van Millingen 

Lotuff Leather Goes Adventuring in Marfa

Tue, 04/22/2014 - 19:47

World travelers Sarah Murphy and Stefaan duPont of Miles & Miles got their hands on some fine leather bags from Lotuff and took them to Marfa, Texas, to shoot the brand’s spring lookbook and video. “When we started brainstorming places to shoot, we really wanted our destination to be somewhere that would communicate the most impressive feature of Lotuff Leather’s products—the craft,” says DuPont. “Marfa’s harsh desert landscape and the realities of living out of a truck and adventuring every day prove that these bags aren’t precious. They’re built to last a lifetime.” The video, seen exclusively here, is loaded with sunbaked desert vibes, complemented perfectly by the dusty grit of a spaghetti Western and some good old-fashioned rugged Americana. The collection, all made in the USA, features styles for both men and women, including a couple that are available now exclusively at Barneys New York, just in time for adventure season.

—Noah Johnson

Marina’s Must-Haves: 3.1 Phillip Lim’s Denim Capsule Collection

Tue, 04/22/2014 - 19:07

It’s denim week at Style.com, and between trend reports, editors’ picks, and more, we are covering all the bases for denim lovers everywhere. Phillip Lim, it seems, is one of them. Today, the designer is launching a capsule denim collection. And he’s a longtime fan of the material. “I have always used denim in the collections—it is really intrinsic to the way we dress. Everyone can relate to denim, so I wanted to refashion it for our lifestyle,” the designer told me when asked about the lineup. Lim’s denim capsule collection features twelve styles for a modern wardrobe, like classic trenchcoats, his famous motorcycle jacket, a chic blazer, and tailored pants. “I wanted the cut to be considered, the finish and the details to be thought-out, but most important, to make it appropriate. I like the crispness of the raw denim and how in the right use it can almost take on a whole new purpose. There is something incredibly rich and classic about the deep blue hue of raw denim, too—it’s as classic as black or navy.” The collection is meant to blend in with your everyday wardrobe, and the dark shades Lim loves so much are just what make these pieces look so polished. It’s hard to pick a favorite!

3.1 Phillip Lim denim capsule collection tops, $195; trenchcoats, from $895. For more information, visit 31philliplim.com. —Marina Larroudé

Photo: Neil Rasmus/BFANYC.com 

Opening Ceremony Gets a New Investor

Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:49

Everyone’s go-to shop for graphic sweatshirts, quirky snapbacks, and killer accessories is getting a major financial boost. WWD reports that Berkshire Partners has recently taken a minority stake in Opening Ceremony. The Boston-based equity firm plans to enhance e-commerce, further develop ready-to-wear, add more locations, and introduce new stores to exclusively sell the Opening Ceremony label. “Since starting Opening Ceremony, Humberto [Leon] and I have worked together to create a company with a strong point of view that offers our customers a fresh shopping experience in our stores, collections, and website,” designer Carol Lim said. “Our growth over the years has been organic, but also strategic, and the relationship with Berkshire provides Opening Ceremony with broad resources to grow to the next level.” —Emily Farra

Photo: Carly Otness/BFAnyc.com

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